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The economic cost of adapting for a warming planet | Counting the Cost (Feature)

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Earlier this year California-based utility Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) became one of the clearest cases of how climate change can wipe out a company that has not done enough to prepare for a warming planet. After costs related to wildfires ballooned, PG&E filed for bankruptcy protection. The company faced approximately $30bn in liabilities as a result of its role in the 2017 and 2018 fires. State investigators linked 100 deaths to the fires. Federal judge William Alsup blamed the cause of some of the fires on the utility's negligence and said the utility had paid $4.5bn to shareholders in dividends over the past five years while failing to take adequate safety precautions. And now Germany's car industry is facing the threat of losing its position as a leading centre for production. A series of missteps - from diesel-cheating scandals to a lack of preparedness for the end of the combustion engine - has left the road open to Uber, Tesla and Chinese electric brands. An industry that employs more than 800,000 people is facing a make-or-break moment. So, are businesses doing enough to prepare for climate change or do executives have their heads in the sand? According to a Global Commission on Adaptation report, businesses need to plan more for a warming planet. Companies that do not adapt may not survive. The report claims investing $1.8 trillion to climate-proof business and the broader economy by 2030 could generate up to $7.1 trillion in net benefits. Half of the world's biggest companies believe climate adaptation could result in $236bn in increased revenue. One of the authors of the report is Feike Sijbesma, chief executive of Dutch life sciences company Royal DSM. Economics editor Abid Ali talks to him about climate change adaptation and why it is important for businesses around the world. Sijbesma points out that no country in the world can escape from climate change. "Addressing climate change mitigation and addressing climate change adaptation is in the interest of all countries and in the interest of all companies," Sijbesma says. "Of course, as companies we are not philanthropic organisations, we need to make money, but there are more interests than only making money and there are more interests than only the short term." - Subscribe to our channel: http://aje.io/AJSubscribe - Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AJEnglish - Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera - Check our website: https://www.aljazeera.com/ Číst dále >>>

How Rihanna’s £486m earnings from her fashion, lingerie and cosmetics line makes you forget she also sings

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WITH a string of hugely successful business brands, blockbuster movie roles and £486million to her name, you could almost forget Rihanna is also a best-selling pop star. In the three-plus years since the release of her last album, Anti, the world’s richest female ­musician has become a major player in the fashion game. And now […] Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?

Náhled

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously? Whether human civilization stays intact amid this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly‘We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.’ Photograph: Noaa/AFP/Getty ImagesNews of Hurricane Dorian’s first casualty came early on Monday morning from the Bahamas Press. A seven-year old boy named Lachino Mcintosh drowned as his family attempted to find safer ground than their home on the Abaco islands. Dorian is reportedly the strongest hurricane to have ever hit the Bahamas and the second most powerful Atlantic storm on record. Five deaths have been reported so far, and more are likely. The Bahamian MP and minister of foreign affairs, the Honorable Darren Henfield, offered a bleak update form the area he represents to reporters: “We have reports of casualties, we have reports of bodies being seen.”Rising temperatures don’t make hurricanes more frequent, but they do help make them more devastating. Each of the last five years have seen Category 5 storms pass through the Atlantic, brewed over hotter than usual waters. How many more people have to die before political leaders treat climate change like the global catastrophe it is?Donald Trump has been rightly criticized for golfing as Dorian devastated the Bahamas and drifted toward the US. But it’s as good a metaphor as any for the way elites across political lines have approached the crisis they have helped create and continue to fuel. One of the cruelest realities of global warming is that the people whohave done the least to contribute to it tend to be among the first and worst hit. Nations like the United States have amassed tremendous wealth both by burning fossil fuels and exploiting land and labor from the places most threatened by rising temperatures through slavery, colonialism and their living legacies. Similar inequalities play out within nations, including in the US, where most people’s own carbon footprints are dwarfed by those of the billionaires and fossil fuel executives best equipped to insulate themselves from heavy weather.Internationally, climate-vulnerable countries have for decades made the case that more ambition is needed, focusing policymakers’ concerns on to issues of equity. The Bahamas is part of a group within the UN known as the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis), comprising countries already being hammered by climate impacts who have got comparatively few financial resources to deal with them. The Aosis chair and Maldives energy minister, Thoriq Ibrahim, argued at COP 24 last year that it would “be suicide not to use every lever of power we have to demand what is fair and just: the support we need to manage a crisis that has been thrust upon us”.That support has not been forthcoming. In its special report released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that keeping warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – a level already dangerous for low-lying states – would require an annual investment in decarbonization of $3tn through 2050. And that’s just to mitigate warming. Trillions more will be required to adapt to the climate impacts already locked in, ensuring that when hurricanes like Dorian do hit they do less damage. Repairing the loss and damage of storms and other disasters is expected to cost $300bn a year by 2030, jumping to $1.2tn a year by 2060. As the world’s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases and its biggest economy, the United States has both the ability and an outsized responsibility to decarbonize rapidly and make it possible for countries do the same – a climate debt.Back in 2009, industrialized nations pledged to mobilize $100bn toward mitigation and adaptation efforts by 2020, a response to persistent demands from climate justice organizers. As of last September, only $3.5bn had actually been allocated to the fund and just $10.3bn pledged to the multilateral body that’s supposed to be the main vehicle for dispersing that money, the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Before he left office, Obama promised $3bn toward the GCF. Just $1bn of that ever materialized before Trump withdrew that vow. That’s a fraction of the estimated $15bn a year the federal government spends subsidizing fossil fuel development. At the end of August, the US Import-Export Bank approved $5bn in financing for a natural gas project in Mozambique. We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroa Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?

Náhled

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously? Whether human civilization stays intact amid this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly‘We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.’ Photograph: Noaa/AFP/Getty ImagesNews of Hurricane Dorian’s first casualty came early on Monday morning from the Bahamas Press. A seven-year old boy named Lachino Mcintosh drowned as his family attempted to find safer ground than their home on the Abaco islands. Dorian is reportedly the strongest hurricane to have ever hit the Bahamas and the second most powerful Atlantic storm on record. Five deaths have been reported so far, and more are likely. The Bahamian MP and minister of foreign affairs, the Honorable Darren Henfield, offered a bleak update form the area he represents to reporters: “We have reports of casualties, we have reports of bodies being seen.”Rising temperatures don’t make hurricanes more frequent, but they do help make them more devastating. Each of the last five years have seen Category 5 storms pass through the Atlantic, brewed over hotter than usual waters. How many more people have to die before political leaders treat climate change like the global catastrophe it is?Donald Trump has been rightly criticized for golfing as Dorian devastated the Bahamas and drifted toward the US. But it’s as good a metaphor as any for the way elites across political lines have approached the crisis they have helped create and continue to fuel. One of the cruelest realities of global warming is that the people whohave done the least to contribute to it tend to be among the first and worst hit. Nations like the United States have amassed tremendous wealth both by burning fossil fuels and exploiting land and labor from the places most threatened by rising temperatures through slavery, colonialism and their living legacies. Similar inequalities play out within nations, including in the US, where most people’s own carbon footprints are dwarfed by those of the billionaires and fossil fuel executives best equipped to insulate themselves from heavy weather.Internationally, climate-vulnerable countries have for decades made the case that more ambition is needed, focusing policymakers’ concerns on to issues of equity. The Bahamas is part of a group within the UN known as the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis), comprising countries already being hammered by climate impacts who have got comparatively few financial resources to deal with them. The Aosis chair and Maldives energy minister, Thoriq Ibrahim, argued at COP 24 last year that it would “be suicide not to use every lever of power we have to demand what is fair and just: the support we need to manage a crisis that has been thrust upon us”.That support has not been forthcoming. In its special report released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that keeping warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – a level already dangerous for low-lying states – would require an annual investment in decarbonization of $3tn through 2050. And that’s just to mitigate warming. Trillions more will be required to adapt to the climate impacts already locked in, ensuring that when hurricanes like Dorian do hit they do less damage. Repairing the loss and damage of storms and other disasters is expected to cost $300bn a year by 2030, jumping to $1.2tn a year by 2060. As the world’s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases and its biggest economy, the United States has both the ability and an outsized responsibility to decarbonize rapidly and make it possible for countries do the same – a climate debt.Back in 2009, industrialized nations pledged to mobilize $100bn toward mitigation and adaptation efforts by 2020, a response to persistent demands from climate justice organizers. As of last September, only $3.5bn had actually been allocated to the fund and just $10.3bn pledged to the multilateral body that’s supposed to be the main vehicle for dispersing that money, the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Before he left office, Obama promised $3bn toward the GCF. Just $1bn of that ever materialized before Trump withdrew that vow. That’s a fraction of the estimated $15bn a year the federal government spends subsidizing fossil fuel development. At the end of August, the US Import-Export Bank approved $5bn in financing for a natural gas project in Mozambique. We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroa Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?

Náhled

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously? Whether human civilization stays intact amid this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly‘We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.’ Photograph: Noaa/AFP/Getty ImagesNews of Hurricane Dorian’s first casualty came early on Monday morning from the Bahamas Press. A seven-year old boy named Lachino Mcintosh drowned as his family attempted to find safer ground than their home on the Abaco islands. Dorian is reportedly the strongest hurricane to have ever hit the Bahamas and the second most powerful Atlantic storm on record. Five deaths have been reported so far, and more are likely. The Bahamian MP and minister of foreign affairs, the Honorable Darren Henfield, offered a bleak update form the area he represents to reporters: “We have reports of casualties, we have reports of bodies being seen.”Rising temperatures don’t make hurricanes more frequent, but they do help make them more devastating. Each of the last five years have seen Category 5 storms pass through the Atlantic, brewed over hotter than usual waters. How many more people have to die before political leaders treat climate change like the global catastrophe it is?Donald Trump has been rightly criticized for golfing as Dorian devastated the Bahamas and drifted toward the US. But it’s as good a metaphor as any for the way elites across political lines have approached the crisis they have helped create and continue to fuel. One of the cruelest realities of global warming is that the people whohave done the least to contribute to it tend to be among the first and worst hit. Nations like the United States have amassed tremendous wealth both by burning fossil fuels and exploiting land and labor from the places most threatened by rising temperatures through slavery, colonialism and their living legacies. Similar inequalities play out within nations, including in the US, where most people’s own carbon footprints are dwarfed by those of the billionaires and fossil fuel executives best equipped to insulate themselves from heavy weather.Internationally, climate-vulnerable countries have for decades made the case that more ambition is needed, focusing policymakers’ concerns on to issues of equity. The Bahamas is part of a group within the UN known as the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis), comprising countries already being hammered by climate impacts who have got comparatively few financial resources to deal with them. The Aosis chair and Maldives energy minister, Thoriq Ibrahim, argued at COP 24 last year that it would “be suicide not to use every lever of power we have to demand what is fair and just: the support we need to manage a crisis that has been thrust upon us”.That support has not been forthcoming. In its special report released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that keeping warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – a level already dangerous for low-lying states – would require an annual investment in decarbonization of $3tn through 2050. And that’s just to mitigate warming. Trillions more will be required to adapt to the climate impacts already locked in, ensuring that when hurricanes like Dorian do hit they do less damage. Repairing the loss and damage of storms and other disasters is expected to cost $300bn a year by 2030, jumping to $1.2tn a year by 2060. As the world’s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases and its biggest economy, the United States has both the ability and an outsized responsibility to decarbonize rapidly and make it possible for countries do the same – a climate debt.Back in 2009, industrialized nations pledged to mobilize $100bn toward mitigation and adaptation efforts by 2020, a response to persistent demands from climate justice organizers. As of last September, only $3.5bn had actually been allocated to the fund and just $10.3bn pledged to the multilateral body that’s supposed to be the main vehicle for dispersing that money, the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Before he left office, Obama promised $3bn toward the GCF. Just $1bn of that ever materialized before Trump withdrew that vow. That’s a fraction of the estimated $15bn a year the federal government spends subsidizing fossil fuel development. At the end of August, the US Import-Export Bank approved $5bn in financing for a natural gas project in Mozambique. We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroa Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?

Náhled

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously? Whether human civilization stays intact amid this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly‘We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.’ Photograph: Noaa/AFP/Getty ImagesNews of Hurricane Dorian’s first casualty came early on Monday morning from the Bahamas Press. A seven-year old boy named Lachino Mcintosh drowned as his family attempted to find safer ground than their home on the Abaco islands. Dorian is reportedly the strongest hurricane to have ever hit the Bahamas and the second most powerful Atlantic storm on record. Five deaths have been reported so far, and more are likely. The Bahamian MP and minister of foreign affairs, the Honorable Darren Henfield, offered a bleak update form the area he represents to reporters: “We have reports of casualties, we have reports of bodies being seen.”Rising temperatures don’t make hurricanes more frequent, but they do help make them more devastating. Each of the last five years have seen Category 5 storms pass through the Atlantic, brewed over hotter than usual waters. How many more people have to die before political leaders treat climate change like the global catastrophe it is?Donald Trump has been rightly criticized for golfing as Dorian devastated the Bahamas and drifted toward the US. But it’s as good a metaphor as any for the way elites across political lines have approached the crisis they have helped create and continue to fuel. One of the cruelest realities of global warming is that the people whohave done the least to contribute to it tend to be among the first and worst hit. Nations like the United States have amassed tremendous wealth both by burning fossil fuels and exploiting land and labor from the places most threatened by rising temperatures through slavery, colonialism and their living legacies. Similar inequalities play out within nations, including in the US, where most people’s own carbon footprints are dwarfed by those of the billionaires and fossil fuel executives best equipped to insulate themselves from heavy weather.Internationally, climate-vulnerable countries have for decades made the case that more ambition is needed, focusing policymakers’ concerns on to issues of equity. The Bahamas is part of a group within the UN known as the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis), comprising countries already being hammered by climate impacts who have got comparatively few financial resources to deal with them. The Aosis chair and Maldives energy minister, Thoriq Ibrahim, argued at COP 24 last year that it would “be suicide not to use every lever of power we have to demand what is fair and just: the support we need to manage a crisis that has been thrust upon us”.That support has not been forthcoming. In its special report released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that keeping warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – a level already dangerous for low-lying states – would require an annual investment in decarbonization of $3tn through 2050. And that’s just to mitigate warming. Trillions more will be required to adapt to the climate impacts already locked in, ensuring that when hurricanes like Dorian do hit they do less damage. Repairing the loss and damage of storms and other disasters is expected to cost $300bn a year by 2030, jumping to $1.2tn a year by 2060. As the world’s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases and its biggest economy, the United States has both the ability and an outsized responsibility to decarbonize rapidly and make it possible for countries do the same – a climate debt.Back in 2009, industrialized nations pledged to mobilize $100bn toward mitigation and adaptation efforts by 2020, a response to persistent demands from climate justice organizers. As of last September, only $3.5bn had actually been allocated to the fund and just $10.3bn pledged to the multilateral body that’s supposed to be the main vehicle for dispersing that money, the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Before he left office, Obama promised $3bn toward the GCF. Just $1bn of that ever materialized before Trump withdrew that vow. That’s a fraction of the estimated $15bn a year the federal government spends subsidizing fossil fuel development. At the end of August, the US Import-Export Bank approved $5bn in financing for a natural gas project in Mozambique. We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroa Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?

Náhled

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously? Whether human civilization stays intact amid this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly‘We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.’ Photograph: Noaa/AFP/Getty ImagesNews of Hurricane Dorian’s first casualty came early on Monday morning from the Bahamas Press. A seven-year old boy named Lachino Mcintosh drowned as his family attempted to find safer ground than their home on the Abaco islands. Dorian is reportedly the strongest hurricane to have ever hit the Bahamas and the second most powerful Atlantic storm on record. Five deaths have been reported so far, and more are likely. The Bahamian MP and minister of foreign affairs, the Honorable Darren Henfield, offered a bleak update form the area he represents to reporters: “We have reports of casualties, we have reports of bodies being seen.”Rising temperatures don’t make hurricanes more frequent, but they do help make them more devastating. Each of the last five years have seen Category 5 storms pass through the Atlantic, brewed over hotter than usual waters. How many more people have to die before political leaders treat climate change like the global catastrophe it is?Donald Trump has been rightly criticized for golfing as Dorian devastated the Bahamas and drifted toward the US. But it’s as good a metaphor as any for the way elites across political lines have approached the crisis they have helped create and continue to fuel. One of the cruelest realities of global warming is that the people whohave done the least to contribute to it tend to be among the first and worst hit. Nations like the United States have amassed tremendous wealth both by burning fossil fuels and exploiting land and labor from the places most threatened by rising temperatures through slavery, colonialism and their living legacies. Similar inequalities play out within nations, including in the US, where most people’s own carbon footprints are dwarfed by those of the billionaires and fossil fuel executives best equipped to insulate themselves from heavy weather.Internationally, climate-vulnerable countries have for decades made the case that more ambition is needed, focusing policymakers’ concerns on to issues of equity. The Bahamas is part of a group within the UN known as the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis), comprising countries already being hammered by climate impacts who have got comparatively few financial resources to deal with them. The Aosis chair and Maldives energy minister, Thoriq Ibrahim, argued at COP 24 last year that it would “be suicide not to use every lever of power we have to demand what is fair and just: the support we need to manage a crisis that has been thrust upon us”.That support has not been forthcoming. In its special report released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that keeping warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – a level already dangerous for low-lying states – would require an annual investment in decarbonization of $3tn through 2050. And that’s just to mitigate warming. Trillions more will be required to adapt to the climate impacts already locked in, ensuring that when hurricanes like Dorian do hit they do less damage. Repairing the loss and damage of storms and other disasters is expected to cost $300bn a year by 2030, jumping to $1.2tn a year by 2060. As the world’s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases and its biggest economy, the United States has both the ability and an outsized responsibility to decarbonize rapidly and make it possible for countries do the same – a climate debt.Back in 2009, industrialized nations pledged to mobilize $100bn toward mitigation and adaptation efforts by 2020, a response to persistent demands from climate justice organizers. As of last September, only $3.5bn had actually been allocated to the fund and just $10.3bn pledged to the multilateral body that’s supposed to be the main vehicle for dispersing that money, the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Before he left office, Obama promised $3bn toward the GCF. Just $1bn of that ever materialized before Trump withdrew that vow. That’s a fraction of the estimated $15bn a year the federal government spends subsidizing fossil fuel development. At the end of August, the US Import-Export Bank approved $5bn in financing for a natural gas project in Mozambique. We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroa Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?

Náhled

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously? Whether human civilization stays intact amid this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly‘We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.’ Photograph: Noaa/AFP/Getty ImagesNews of Hurricane Dorian’s first casualty came early on Monday morning from the Bahamas Press. A seven-year old boy named Lachino Mcintosh drowned as his family attempted to find safer ground than their home on the Abaco islands. Dorian is reportedly the strongest hurricane to have ever hit the Bahamas and the second most powerful Atlantic storm on record. Five deaths have been reported so far, and more are likely. The Bahamian MP and minister of foreign affairs, the Honorable Darren Henfield, offered a bleak update form the area he represents to reporters: “We have reports of casualties, we have reports of bodies being seen.”Rising temperatures don’t make hurricanes more frequent, but they do help make them more devastating. Each of the last five years have seen Category 5 storms pass through the Atlantic, brewed over hotter than usual waters. How many more people have to die before political leaders treat climate change like the global catastrophe it is?Donald Trump has been rightly criticized for golfing as Dorian devastated the Bahamas and drifted toward the US. But it’s as good a metaphor as any for the way elites across political lines have approached the crisis they have helped create and continue to fuel. One of the cruelest realities of global warming is that the people whohave done the least to contribute to it tend to be among the first and worst hit. Nations like the United States have amassed tremendous wealth both by burning fossil fuels and exploiting land and labor from the places most threatened by rising temperatures through slavery, colonialism and their living legacies. Similar inequalities play out within nations, including in the US, where most people’s own carbon footprints are dwarfed by those of the billionaires and fossil fuel executives best equipped to insulate themselves from heavy weather.Internationally, climate-vulnerable countries have for decades made the case that more ambition is needed, focusing policymakers’ concerns on to issues of equity. The Bahamas is part of a group within the UN known as the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis), comprising countries already being hammered by climate impacts who have got comparatively few financial resources to deal with them. The Aosis chair and Maldives energy minister, Thoriq Ibrahim, argued at COP 24 last year that it would “be suicide not to use every lever of power we have to demand what is fair and just: the support we need to manage a crisis that has been thrust upon us”.That support has not been forthcoming. In its special report released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that keeping warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – a level already dangerous for low-lying states – would require an annual investment in decarbonization of $3tn through 2050. And that’s just to mitigate warming. Trillions more will be required to adapt to the climate impacts already locked in, ensuring that when hurricanes like Dorian do hit they do less damage. Repairing the loss and damage of storms and other disasters is expected to cost $300bn a year by 2030, jumping to $1.2tn a year by 2060. As the world’s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases and its biggest economy, the United States has both the ability and an outsized responsibility to decarbonize rapidly and make it possible for countries do the same – a climate debt.Back in 2009, industrialized nations pledged to mobilize $100bn toward mitigation and adaptation efforts by 2020, a response to persistent demands from climate justice organizers. As of last September, only $3.5bn had actually been allocated to the fund and just $10.3bn pledged to the multilateral body that’s supposed to be the main vehicle for dispersing that money, the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Before he left office, Obama promised $3bn toward the GCF. Just $1bn of that ever materialized before Trump withdrew that vow. That’s a fraction of the estimated $15bn a year the federal government spends subsidizing fossil fuel development. At the end of August, the US Import-Export Bank approved $5bn in financing for a natural gas project in Mozambique. We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroa Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously?

Náhled

How much destruction is needed for us to take climate change seriously? Whether human civilization stays intact amid this worsening weather depends on recognizing our shared humanity – and designing policy accordingly‘We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroad. It’s just going to all the wrong places.’ Photograph: Noaa/AFP/Getty ImagesNews of Hurricane Dorian’s first casualty came early on Monday morning from the Bahamas Press. A seven-year old boy named Lachino Mcintosh drowned as his family attempted to find safer ground than their home on the Abaco islands. Dorian is reportedly the strongest hurricane to have ever hit the Bahamas and the second most powerful Atlantic storm on record. Five deaths have been reported so far, and more are likely. The Bahamian MP and minister of foreign affairs, the Honorable Darren Henfield, offered a bleak update form the area he represents to reporters: “We have reports of casualties, we have reports of bodies being seen.”Rising temperatures don’t make hurricanes more frequent, but they do help make them more devastating. Each of the last five years have seen Category 5 storms pass through the Atlantic, brewed over hotter than usual waters. How many more people have to die before political leaders treat climate change like the global catastrophe it is?Donald Trump has been rightly criticized for golfing as Dorian devastated the Bahamas and drifted toward the US. But it’s as good a metaphor as any for the way elites across political lines have approached the crisis they have helped create and continue to fuel. One of the cruelest realities of global warming is that the people whohave done the least to contribute to it tend to be among the first and worst hit. Nations like the United States have amassed tremendous wealth both by burning fossil fuels and exploiting land and labor from the places most threatened by rising temperatures through slavery, colonialism and their living legacies. Similar inequalities play out within nations, including in the US, where most people’s own carbon footprints are dwarfed by those of the billionaires and fossil fuel executives best equipped to insulate themselves from heavy weather.Internationally, climate-vulnerable countries have for decades made the case that more ambition is needed, focusing policymakers’ concerns on to issues of equity. The Bahamas is part of a group within the UN known as the Alliance of Small Island States (Aosis), comprising countries already being hammered by climate impacts who have got comparatively few financial resources to deal with them. The Aosis chair and Maldives energy minister, Thoriq Ibrahim, argued at COP 24 last year that it would “be suicide not to use every lever of power we have to demand what is fair and just: the support we need to manage a crisis that has been thrust upon us”.That support has not been forthcoming. In its special report released last year, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change found that keeping warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius – a level already dangerous for low-lying states – would require an annual investment in decarbonization of $3tn through 2050. And that’s just to mitigate warming. Trillions more will be required to adapt to the climate impacts already locked in, ensuring that when hurricanes like Dorian do hit they do less damage. Repairing the loss and damage of storms and other disasters is expected to cost $300bn a year by 2030, jumping to $1.2tn a year by 2060. As the world’s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases and its biggest economy, the United States has both the ability and an outsized responsibility to decarbonize rapidly and make it possible for countries do the same – a climate debt.Back in 2009, industrialized nations pledged to mobilize $100bn toward mitigation and adaptation efforts by 2020, a response to persistent demands from climate justice organizers. As of last September, only $3.5bn had actually been allocated to the fund and just $10.3bn pledged to the multilateral body that’s supposed to be the main vehicle for dispersing that money, the Green Climate Fund (GCF). Before he left office, Obama promised $3bn toward the GCF. Just $1bn of that ever materialized before Trump withdrew that vow. That’s a fraction of the estimated $15bn a year the federal government spends subsidizing fossil fuel development. At the end of August, the US Import-Export Bank approved $5bn in financing for a natural gas project in Mozambique. We have more than enough money to fight the climate crisis, at home and abroa Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

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MARHOUL A JEHO PTÁČEK

Petr Novák 16.09.2019, 18:09

V poslední době se o tomto filmu, natočeném dle knihy pana Jerzy Kosinského, dost mluví a protože není kouře bez ohně, tak by bylo dobré se podívat na to, co nám tento proces říká z hlediska řízení společnosti. Takto definuje daný film jeho tvůrce pan Marhoul: „Nabarvené ptáče je hluboce dramatický příběh zaobírající se bezprostředním
číst...

Henry Ford byl v prvé řadě člověk, podnikatelem byl až na druhém místě

Daniel Novák 16.09.2019, 18:03

H. Ford byl de jure soukromým vlastníkem, ale de-facto vnímal svoje podniky jako majetek společnosti. Proto když uzavíral kupní/prodejní smlouvy a plánovitě snižoval ceny na produkci, vycházel z cíle služby společnosti. Jednoduše na svých závodech a železnici Henry Ford zavedl osmihodinový pracovní den a garantovaný plat, a zdokonalujíc dílo, které vedl na tomto organizačním základě,
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Vyhlášení Protektorátu Čechy a Morava 15.9.1939 a 15.9.2019

Ivo Gec 16.09.2019, 17:59

Dnešního dne si připomínáme neblahého výročí vyhlášení protektorátu Böhmen und Mähren a totální okupace německou fašistickou armádou. Na území protektorátu začínají platit zákony německé nacistické 3. říše, jsou zatýkáni čeští vlastenci, komunisté a Židé. Je zahájen protifašistický odboj a odbojové skupiny přechází do totální ilegality. Od této události uplynulo 80 let a jedná se tedy
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Žaluji!

Lubomír Man 16.09.2019, 17:56

V Česku se chystá zločin. Ohavnější, než jakýkoli jiný námi Čechy v historii spáchaný. V jedné z nadcházejících nocí přikodrcá k bronzové soše maršála Ivana Koněva na náměstí Interbrigády co nejtišeji nákladní auto s korbou plnou mlčících chlapů v montérkách, a přesně tak, jak to jejich předchůdci v profesi činili kdysi, když za pokračujícího spánku
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Přehled zpráv – RusVesna, RusNext 15.9.2019

Božena W. 16.09.2019, 17:45

1; V Donbasu neznámý ostřelovač zlikvidoval vyšší důstojníky elitních jednotek ukrajinské armády. Informuje o tom štáb okupačních sil. Ukrajinská média zjišťují, co přesně se stalo. 2; CIA odtajnila dokumenty o přípravě „bojových holubů“ pro boj proti SSSR. Volba padla právě na tyto ptáky kvůli jejich schopnosti nést na svém těle 16 mm kameru s vysokým
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Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství

S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 12. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 08.12.2016, 12:37

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 11. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 28.11.2016, 15:53

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 10. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 23.11.2016, 01:35

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 9. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 16.11.2016, 13:26

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 8. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 08.11.2016, 11:57

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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Tomio Okamura

Tomio Okamura: Mnoho lidí nemá ani na zuby.

Tomio Okamura 16.09.2019, 10:21

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: SPD nepodpořilo rozšíření NATO o Severní Makedonii.

Tomio Okamura 13.09.2019, 20:47

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: NE zavedení evropského žalobce.

Tomio Okamura 12.09.2019, 18:25

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: Budou se navyšovat důchody.

Tomio Okamura 11.09.2019, 21:11

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: Vláda slíbila vyplatit Turecku výpalné 290 mil. Kč!

Tomio Okamura 11.09.2019, 11:24

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Česká televize

StarDance jede za Vámi! Flashmob

Česká televize 13.09.2019, 13:45

Doražte na jednu z našich událostí StarDance do Ostravy, Brna, či Hradce Králové a zúčastněte se tak naprosto originálního flashmobu. Jak se na něj připravit naleznete ve videu. 🕺 Odkazy na jednotlivé akce: ▶️27. 9. Ostrava https://www.facebook.com/events/714784212339612/ ▶️28. 9. Brno https://www.facebook.com/events/694771571022939/ ▶️29. 9. Hradec Králové https://www.facebook.com/events/382608159357237/
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REPORTÉŘI ČT - Proč věří návštěvníci Čapího hnízda premiérovi

Česká televize 12.09.2019, 10:01

Anketa pořadu Reprotéři ČT s návštěvníky Čapího hnízda. Celý díl pořadu Reportéři ČT sledujte na iVysilani a nebo zde v odkazech. https://www.ceskatelevize.cz/porady/1142743803-reporteri-ct/219452801240026/video/718068 https://www.facebook.com/reporterict/videos/2262678957192058/ Sledujet nás na našich sociálních sítích: FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/reporterict/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/reporterict WEB: https://www.ceskatelevize.cz/reporterict #teaser #babis #navstevnici #capihnizdo
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Reportéři ČT - Fiala M., Paclíková A. - Horká planeta

Česká televize 10.09.2019, 11:05

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Paclíková A., Srnka V. - V rybníčku pana kancléře

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Paclíková A., Srnka V. - Příběh jednoho podnámu

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Vy tanky, my branky

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Ve šroubovici Přemyslovců

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Dědečci

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Ve jménu národa

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Kutilová M, Klicperová L - Vzpoura běženců

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57
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ParlamentníListy.cz

ParlamentníListy.cz

Česká politická scéna jako na dlani

Redaktor a kameraman ČT útočili na premiéra na výstavě, otrávení lidé jim nadávali. Svědectví, co se dělo po skončení kauzy Čapí hnízdo

16.09.2019, 19:39

Na výstavě Zahrada Čech, kam se premiér Babiš neohlášený zajal podívat minulý pátek, jej pronásledoval štáb České televize, vyptávající se na zastavení trestního stíhání v kauze Čapí hnízdo. Exsenátor Jan Veleba, který vše sledoval zblízka, teď popisuje, co se kolem toho odehrávalo.
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Klimatolog Václav Cílek dělá jasno: Nemluvte pouze o klimatické změně. Jsou prognózy, které v roce 2050 počítají s ochlazením

16.09.2019, 20:58

Ze změny klimatu se stalo politikum, ale nevidím to zase tak černě... říká klimatolog, geolog, popularizátor vědy, spisovatel a překladatel RNDr. Václav Cílek, CSc. Jaké jsou tři hlavní problémy spojené s klimatem? Jak souvisí populační vlna s genocidou? Chystá se skutečně exodus desítek milionů afrických uprchlíků do Evropy? A kterak zásadně mohou klimatické změny ovlivnit celosvětovou budoucnost?
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Z prdu kuličku neuděláš, pravil znalec medií po zhlédnutí pořadu o fake news. Amatérské, jednostranné, vůbec to nemělo vzniknout

16.09.2019, 19:50

„Ten pořad je od začátku špatný a měl by být koncipován úplně jinak. Jestli se inspirovali ze Západu, tak tohle bylo dosti amatérské,“ hodnotí nový pořad České televize s názvem To se ví mediální analytik Jiří Mikeš s tím, že je pokleslý a očekával více odbornosti. Kritizoval také politický výběr témat s tím, že je neobjektivní. Naopak politolog Lukáš Jelínek tvrdí, že mu politická satira na obrazovce chyběla a v tomto formátu je novinka zajímavá i pro příjemce informací, kteří se o politiku nezajímají.
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Odpad! Diváci zúčtovali s ČT za pořad o „fake news“. A koukejte, kdo se přidal

16.09.2019, 13:44

Kvalitu nového osvětového pořadu nehodnotili jen uživatelé Facebooku, ale i kritici na ČSFD. A ani tam si nebrali servítky, hodnocení „odpad!“ jasně dominovalo. Jeden z hodnotitelů si neodpustil narážku, že i Talk show Jiřího Ovčáčka je lepší. Přišla i výtka, že cílová skupina, kterou by měl pořad vzdělávat, už při vysílání dávno spí. A do pořadu se pustila i kritička na iDNES. „Jedno velké nabádavé trojnásobné N čili Nic Než Nuda,“ zhodnotila pořad s Halinou Pawlowskou a Alešem Hámou.
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Vnuk válečného veterána se připoutal k soše Koněva. Zmrzlej komouš není špatná představa, zaznělo k tomu u příspěvku Jakuba Jandy

16.09.2019, 18:19

K soše maršála Koněva na pražském náměstí Interbrigády se v pondělí v podvečer připoutal mladý muž. Je to další epizoda do příběhu pomníku, který chce starosta Ondřej Kolář z TOP 09 odstranit a řada obyvatel s ním nesouhlasí.
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Zvědavec

Skládáme střípky informací

Fake news posloužily k ospravedlnění totální války: výmysl o bosensko-srbském „táboru smrti“

Autor neuveden 16.09.2019, 01:10

Poprvé publikováno na webu Global Research 15. července 2015. Článek je staršího data, zařazuji jej za poslední článek Michala Branda Alan Kurdi jako symbol, abych ukázal, že falešné a úmyslně naaranžované fotky, které hýbou veřejným míněním a mění směr událostí, nejsou neobvyklé. Mainstream sahá k těmto desinformacím často a beze studu. No, hlavně že na ČT1 běží ve chvíli, kdy toto píši (neděle 22:20) propagandistický pořad To se ví, který „zábavnou formou odhaluje „falešné zprávy“. Editor
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Alan Kurdi jako symbol

Michal Brand 14.09.2019, 01:10

K dnešní úvaze mne inspiroval komentář Tomáše Vyorala a jeho komentář k Alanu Kurdimu a symbolice jeho smrti a fotky. Alan Kurdi, ten malý syrský chlapec, který se utopil v Egejském moři. Jeho fotografie oblétly svět. Měly to být fotografie, které změní svět, jak psala pro-migrantská propaganda. A svým způsobem to tak i být může. Alan Kurdi je totiž opravdu symbolem. Pojďme se podívat na jeho příběh. A na fakta. Připravte se na tvrdou, hořkou realitu – daleko horší, než líčila mas-mediální propaganda.
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Vtip a realita

Jaroslav Tichý 13.09.2019, 01:59

Podle některých odborných definic „vtip, anekdota, popřípadě fór, je krátké vyprávění, jehož účelem je pobavit příjemce (posluchače či čtenáře). Obvykle je založen na dvojznačnosti, absurditě nebo paradoxu, je stručný a směřuje k výrazné a úderné pointě. S ohledem na krátkost toho následujícího vyprávění zůstaňme u pojmu vtip. Příklad vtipu z filmu „Sedm statečných“: - muž vypadne z 10. patra činžáku; - a zatímco padá, v každém patře si říká, zatím je to v pořádku.
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Obchodní války jsou hrou blázna

Eric Margolis 12.09.2019, 01:10

Podle brilantního vojenského myslitele, generálmajora J.F.C. Fullera, „cílem války není vítězství. Je jím dosažení politických cílů.“ Věčná škoda, že prezident Donald Trump nečte knihy. Zahájil ekonomické války proti Číně, Rusku, Íránu, Kubě a Venezuele bez jakéhokoli jasného strategického cíle, až na to, že se nafouklo jeho ego coby světového předního vojenského vůdce, a že tyto státy potrestal za jejich neposlušnost.
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Pokud existuje něco jako vražedná kultura, pak je v Izraeli

Gideon Levy 11.09.2019, 01:10

Tohle napsal Benny Ziffer, redaktor přílohy Kultura a literatura izraelského deníku Haaretz, na své facebookové stránce poté, co se vrátil z osady Ofra, kterou navštívil v souvislosti s projevem soustrasti: „Cestou jsem se díval na palestinské vesnice podél židovských komunit, a pomyslel jsem si, že pro Palestince je vražda něco jako sport nebo zábava, možná je to náhražka za erotiku. Z tohoto hlediska s nimi nikdy nebudeme mít nic kulturně společného.“
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Overtonovo okno: Když příklad dojde naplnění

Autor neuveden 10.09.2019, 01:10

Veškeré pokrokové lidstvo, jak nás označují, naprosto přirozeně přijalo homosexuály a jejich subkulturu, jejich právo uzavírat manželství, adoptovat děti a obhajovat svou sexuální orientaci ve školách a mateřských školkách. Snaží se nám dokázat, že je to všechno přirozený běh věcí. Lžou nám.
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Pod „ochranou“ amerických jaderných zbraní v Evropě

Manlio Dinucci 09.09.2019, 01:10

Od doby, kdy USA odstoupily od smlouvy INF, Atlantická aliance znovu umístila svá odpalovací zařízení a jaderné rakety středního doletu. To přeměnilo střední a západní Evropu - a také Pacifik - na bojiště.
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Politikové, mafie a územní plány

Autor neuveden 07.09.2019, 01:10

Zdědil jsem po pradědovi několik hektaru pole v sousedství vesnice u velkého města. Během dvaceti let po revoluci se v okolí začalo silně stavět a tak jsem se rozhodl, že pozemky taky prodám, opustím byt v paneláku a z utržených peněz si na svém postavím vysněný dům. Zažádal jsem tedy o změnu ÚP a jako Alenka z Říše Divů zapadl, na 10 let, až po krk do zkorumpovaného světa regionálních politiků a úředníků.
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