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Pablo Escobar’s brother launches gold smartphone emblazoned with coke kingpin’s face with the help of naked models

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PABLO Escobar’s brother has ‘launched’ a gold smartphone with the help of a bevvy of naked models. Publicity-mad Roberto Escobar unveiled the $349 Escobar Fold 1 this week – but the dodgy device is just a repainted Chinese handset. Revealing the phone with a raunchy promotional video, he claimed it will help him take down […] Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Blake Treinen becomes intriguing new option in MLB free agency

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A flamethrowing reliever has become a surprise addition to MLB free agency. The A’s non-tendered Blake Treinen on Monday, making the 2018 All-Star a new hot commodity for teams seeking bullpen help. The 31-year-old Treinen had been rumored as a trade candidate in the days leading up to Monday’s non-tender deadline, with the Yankees reportedly... Číst dále >>>

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges

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How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastOn the evening of Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, residents of a country-club neighborhood in Columbia, Missouri, went to bed unaware that one of their neighbors had nearly 1,000 pounds of high-grade Oregon marijuana parked in the driveway outside his home.  The home was being rented by 28-year-old Augustus “Gus” Roberts, the son of a circuit court judge. Under the cover of darkness, several suspects forced their way inside, murdered him, and made off with the weed-filled U-Haul.The killers didn’t go far, abandoning the U-Haul at the end of the neighborhood’s cul-de-sac. Police arrived to find Roberts outside, near his driveway, dead of an apparent gunshot wound. They also found 94 pounds of weed and 3,000 THC oil pens used for vaping in the trailer and in Roberts’ bedroom closet. In the year and a half since, nine people have been arrested as a result of the homicide investigation—though none of them has been charged with committing that crime. Instead, law enforcement officials have rounded up a collection of Roberts’ alleged co-conspirators on drug-related counts.The highest-profile bust was Eapen Thampy, a well-known lobbyist around the state Capitol whose chief issue has been marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform—and who is now accused of being part of a network that distributed more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana over three years. The charges—which stem from the Roberts investigation, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit—could put Thampy in prison for life.It’s not lost on supporters of marijuana policy reform that Roberts’ death was precisely the type of violence that they believe legalization would prevent. “Once you have organized crime you have people taking matters into their own hands,” says Steve Fox, president of VS Strategies and a longtime D.C.-based marijuana policy reform advocate. “The same issues you had associated with alcohol prohibition in the early part of the last century, with organized crime and violence—those things largely, if not entirely, go away once the substance in question is legal and regulated.”In 2015, at the age of 31, Thampy founded Heartland Priorities, an organization that lobbies for marijuana legalization. He occupied a distinctive niche in the effort by arguing for reform from a right-wing and Libertarian perspective to a state legislature controlled by a Republican super-majority. He regularly appeared on talk radio throughout the state and beat the drum for individual liberty as a basis for legal weed and for criminal justice and sentencing reform. He’s been photographed with Sens. Rand Paul and Roy Blunt, as well as a former governor and current state attorney general.“It breaks my heart that this is happening to him,” says Tom Mundell, a Silver Star and Purple Heart recipient who focuses on marijuana reform from a veterans and PTSD perspective. “He was doing a lot to give people who had never had a break in their life the opportunity to have generational wealth through the hemp industry.”But authorities allege that Thampy had a side hustle to his political work. They claim in the indictment that between January 2015 and September 2018, he was part of a drug distribution network connected to Roberts.According to a DEA agent’s affidavit, before Roberts’ death, he was receiving marijuana from Oregon via a middleman who had been a DEA informant in the past and who supplied Roberts “with 280 to 350 pounds of marijuana every three to four weeks” for about nine months up until his death. After Roberts was killed, the middleman began cooperating with the feds again and arranged for an especially large shipment of marijuana to be sent from Oregon to Missouri, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit. Authorities intercepted some 1,800 pounds of high-grade weed from a commercial trailer in Wyoming and arrested Craig Smith of Oregon, Roberts’ alleged supplier. Among other things, the indictment charges in a separate count that Smith and Thampy sought to sell a smaller amount of marijuana in February of last year.Authorities have charged seven others, including a Columbia mother and son who allegedly used drug-dealing proceeds to purchase, among other things, a flamethrower. Court documents allege one of the defendants donated $1,000 in drug money to Better Way Missouri, a political action committee represented by Thampy. Thampy, who is free pending trial next year, declined to comment for this article, and calls to his attorney were not Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges

Náhled

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastOn the evening of Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, residents of a country-club neighborhood in Columbia, Missouri, went to bed unaware that one of their neighbors had nearly 1,000 pounds of high-grade Oregon marijuana parked in the driveway outside his home.  The home was being rented by 28-year-old Augustus “Gus” Roberts, the son of a circuit court judge. Under the cover of darkness, several suspects forced their way inside, murdered him, and made off with the weed-filled U-Haul.The killers didn’t go far, abandoning the U-Haul at the end of the neighborhood’s cul-de-sac. Police arrived to find Roberts outside, near his driveway, dead of an apparent gunshot wound. They also found 94 pounds of weed and 3,000 THC oil pens used for vaping in the trailer and in Roberts’ bedroom closet. In the year and a half since, nine people have been arrested as a result of the homicide investigation—though none of them has been charged with committing that crime. Instead, law enforcement officials have rounded up a collection of Roberts’ alleged co-conspirators on drug-related counts.The highest-profile bust was Eapen Thampy, a well-known lobbyist around the state Capitol whose chief issue has been marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform—and who is now accused of being part of a network that distributed more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana over three years. The charges—which stem from the Roberts investigation, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit—could put Thampy in prison for life.It’s not lost on supporters of marijuana policy reform that Roberts’ death was precisely the type of violence that they believe legalization would prevent. “Once you have organized crime you have people taking matters into their own hands,” says Steve Fox, president of VS Strategies and a longtime D.C.-based marijuana policy reform advocate. “The same issues you had associated with alcohol prohibition in the early part of the last century, with organized crime and violence—those things largely, if not entirely, go away once the substance in question is legal and regulated.”In 2015, at the age of 31, Thampy founded Heartland Priorities, an organization that lobbies for marijuana legalization. He occupied a distinctive niche in the effort by arguing for reform from a right-wing and Libertarian perspective to a state legislature controlled by a Republican super-majority. He regularly appeared on talk radio throughout the state and beat the drum for individual liberty as a basis for legal weed and for criminal justice and sentencing reform. He’s been photographed with Sens. Rand Paul and Roy Blunt, as well as a former governor and current state attorney general.“It breaks my heart that this is happening to him,” says Tom Mundell, a Silver Star and Purple Heart recipient who focuses on marijuana reform from a veterans and PTSD perspective. “He was doing a lot to give people who had never had a break in their life the opportunity to have generational wealth through the hemp industry.”But authorities allege that Thampy had a side hustle to his political work. They claim in the indictment that between January 2015 and September 2018, he was part of a drug distribution network connected to Roberts.According to a DEA agent’s affidavit, before Roberts’ death, he was receiving marijuana from Oregon via a middleman who had been a DEA informant in the past and who supplied Roberts “with 280 to 350 pounds of marijuana every three to four weeks” for about nine months up until his death. After Roberts was killed, the middleman began cooperating with the feds again and arranged for an especially large shipment of marijuana to be sent from Oregon to Missouri, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit. Authorities intercepted some 1,800 pounds of high-grade weed from a commercial trailer in Wyoming and arrested Craig Smith of Oregon, Roberts’ alleged supplier. Among other things, the indictment charges in a separate count that Smith and Thampy sought to sell a smaller amount of marijuana in February of last year.Authorities have charged seven others, including a Columbia mother and son who allegedly used drug-dealing proceeds to purchase, among other things, a flamethrower. Court documents allege one of the defendants donated $1,000 in drug money to Better Way Missouri, a political action committee represented by Thampy. Thampy, who is free pending trial next year, declined to comment for this article, and calls to his attorney were not Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges

Náhled

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastOn the evening of Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, residents of a country-club neighborhood in Columbia, Missouri, went to bed unaware that one of their neighbors had nearly 1,000 pounds of high-grade Oregon marijuana parked in the driveway outside his home.  The home was being rented by 28-year-old Augustus “Gus” Roberts, the son of a circuit court judge. Under the cover of darkness, several suspects forced their way inside, murdered him, and made off with the weed-filled U-Haul.The killers didn’t go far, abandoning the U-Haul at the end of the neighborhood’s cul-de-sac. Police arrived to find Roberts outside, near his driveway, dead of an apparent gunshot wound. They also found 94 pounds of weed and 3,000 THC oil pens used for vaping in the trailer and in Roberts’ bedroom closet. In the year and a half since, nine people have been arrested as a result of the homicide investigation—though none of them has been charged with committing that crime. Instead, law enforcement officials have rounded up a collection of Roberts’ alleged co-conspirators on drug-related counts.The highest-profile bust was Eapen Thampy, a well-known lobbyist around the state Capitol whose chief issue has been marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform—and who is now accused of being part of a network that distributed more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana over three years. The charges—which stem from the Roberts investigation, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit—could put Thampy in prison for life.It’s not lost on supporters of marijuana policy reform that Roberts’ death was precisely the type of violence that they believe legalization would prevent. “Once you have organized crime you have people taking matters into their own hands,” says Steve Fox, president of VS Strategies and a longtime D.C.-based marijuana policy reform advocate. “The same issues you had associated with alcohol prohibition in the early part of the last century, with organized crime and violence—those things largely, if not entirely, go away once the substance in question is legal and regulated.”In 2015, at the age of 31, Thampy founded Heartland Priorities, an organization that lobbies for marijuana legalization. He occupied a distinctive niche in the effort by arguing for reform from a right-wing and Libertarian perspective to a state legislature controlled by a Republican super-majority. He regularly appeared on talk radio throughout the state and beat the drum for individual liberty as a basis for legal weed and for criminal justice and sentencing reform. He’s been photographed with Sens. Rand Paul and Roy Blunt, as well as a former governor and current state attorney general.“It breaks my heart that this is happening to him,” says Tom Mundell, a Silver Star and Purple Heart recipient who focuses on marijuana reform from a veterans and PTSD perspective. “He was doing a lot to give people who had never had a break in their life the opportunity to have generational wealth through the hemp industry.”But authorities allege that Thampy had a side hustle to his political work. They claim in the indictment that between January 2015 and September 2018, he was part of a drug distribution network connected to Roberts.According to a DEA agent’s affidavit, before Roberts’ death, he was receiving marijuana from Oregon via a middleman who had been a DEA informant in the past and who supplied Roberts “with 280 to 350 pounds of marijuana every three to four weeks” for about nine months up until his death. After Roberts was killed, the middleman began cooperating with the feds again and arranged for an especially large shipment of marijuana to be sent from Oregon to Missouri, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit. Authorities intercepted some 1,800 pounds of high-grade weed from a commercial trailer in Wyoming and arrested Craig Smith of Oregon, Roberts’ alleged supplier. Among other things, the indictment charges in a separate count that Smith and Thampy sought to sell a smaller amount of marijuana in February of last year.Authorities have charged seven others, including a Columbia mother and son who allegedly used drug-dealing proceeds to purchase, among other things, a flamethrower. Court documents allege one of the defendants donated $1,000 in drug money to Better Way Missouri, a political action committee represented by Thampy. Thampy, who is free pending trial next year, declined to comment for this article, and calls to his attorney were not Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges

Náhled

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastOn the evening of Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, residents of a country-club neighborhood in Columbia, Missouri, went to bed unaware that one of their neighbors had nearly 1,000 pounds of high-grade Oregon marijuana parked in the driveway outside his home.  The home was being rented by 28-year-old Augustus “Gus” Roberts, the son of a circuit court judge. Under the cover of darkness, several suspects forced their way inside, murdered him, and made off with the weed-filled U-Haul.The killers didn’t go far, abandoning the U-Haul at the end of the neighborhood’s cul-de-sac. Police arrived to find Roberts outside, near his driveway, dead of an apparent gunshot wound. They also found 94 pounds of weed and 3,000 THC oil pens used for vaping in the trailer and in Roberts’ bedroom closet. In the year and a half since, nine people have been arrested as a result of the homicide investigation—though none of them has been charged with committing that crime. Instead, law enforcement officials have rounded up a collection of Roberts’ alleged co-conspirators on drug-related counts.The highest-profile bust was Eapen Thampy, a well-known lobbyist around the state Capitol whose chief issue has been marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform—and who is now accused of being part of a network that distributed more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana over three years. The charges—which stem from the Roberts investigation, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit—could put Thampy in prison for life.It’s not lost on supporters of marijuana policy reform that Roberts’ death was precisely the type of violence that they believe legalization would prevent. “Once you have organized crime you have people taking matters into their own hands,” says Steve Fox, president of VS Strategies and a longtime D.C.-based marijuana policy reform advocate. “The same issues you had associated with alcohol prohibition in the early part of the last century, with organized crime and violence—those things largely, if not entirely, go away once the substance in question is legal and regulated.”In 2015, at the age of 31, Thampy founded Heartland Priorities, an organization that lobbies for marijuana legalization. He occupied a distinctive niche in the effort by arguing for reform from a right-wing and Libertarian perspective to a state legislature controlled by a Republican super-majority. He regularly appeared on talk radio throughout the state and beat the drum for individual liberty as a basis for legal weed and for criminal justice and sentencing reform. He’s been photographed with Sens. Rand Paul and Roy Blunt, as well as a former governor and current state attorney general.“It breaks my heart that this is happening to him,” says Tom Mundell, a Silver Star and Purple Heart recipient who focuses on marijuana reform from a veterans and PTSD perspective. “He was doing a lot to give people who had never had a break in their life the opportunity to have generational wealth through the hemp industry.”But authorities allege that Thampy had a side hustle to his political work. They claim in the indictment that between January 2015 and September 2018, he was part of a drug distribution network connected to Roberts.According to a DEA agent’s affidavit, before Roberts’ death, he was receiving marijuana from Oregon via a middleman who had been a DEA informant in the past and who supplied Roberts “with 280 to 350 pounds of marijuana every three to four weeks” for about nine months up until his death. After Roberts was killed, the middleman began cooperating with the feds again and arranged for an especially large shipment of marijuana to be sent from Oregon to Missouri, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit. Authorities intercepted some 1,800 pounds of high-grade weed from a commercial trailer in Wyoming and arrested Craig Smith of Oregon, Roberts’ alleged supplier. Among other things, the indictment charges in a separate count that Smith and Thampy sought to sell a smaller amount of marijuana in February of last year.Authorities have charged seven others, including a Columbia mother and son who allegedly used drug-dealing proceeds to purchase, among other things, a flamethrower. Court documents allege one of the defendants donated $1,000 in drug money to Better Way Missouri, a political action committee represented by Thampy. Thampy, who is free pending trial next year, declined to comment for this article, and calls to his attorney were not Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges

Náhled

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastOn the evening of Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, residents of a country-club neighborhood in Columbia, Missouri, went to bed unaware that one of their neighbors had nearly 1,000 pounds of high-grade Oregon marijuana parked in the driveway outside his home.  The home was being rented by 28-year-old Augustus “Gus” Roberts, the son of a circuit court judge. Under the cover of darkness, several suspects forced their way inside, murdered him, and made off with the weed-filled U-Haul.The killers didn’t go far, abandoning the U-Haul at the end of the neighborhood’s cul-de-sac. Police arrived to find Roberts outside, near his driveway, dead of an apparent gunshot wound. They also found 94 pounds of weed and 3,000 THC oil pens used for vaping in the trailer and in Roberts’ bedroom closet. In the year and a half since, nine people have been arrested as a result of the homicide investigation—though none of them has been charged with committing that crime. Instead, law enforcement officials have rounded up a collection of Roberts’ alleged co-conspirators on drug-related counts.The highest-profile bust was Eapen Thampy, a well-known lobbyist around the state Capitol whose chief issue has been marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform—and who is now accused of being part of a network that distributed more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana over three years. The charges—which stem from the Roberts investigation, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit—could put Thampy in prison for life.It’s not lost on supporters of marijuana policy reform that Roberts’ death was precisely the type of violence that they believe legalization would prevent. “Once you have organized crime you have people taking matters into their own hands,” says Steve Fox, president of VS Strategies and a longtime D.C.-based marijuana policy reform advocate. “The same issues you had associated with alcohol prohibition in the early part of the last century, with organized crime and violence—those things largely, if not entirely, go away once the substance in question is legal and regulated.”In 2015, at the age of 31, Thampy founded Heartland Priorities, an organization that lobbies for marijuana legalization. He occupied a distinctive niche in the effort by arguing for reform from a right-wing and Libertarian perspective to a state legislature controlled by a Republican super-majority. He regularly appeared on talk radio throughout the state and beat the drum for individual liberty as a basis for legal weed and for criminal justice and sentencing reform. He’s been photographed with Sens. Rand Paul and Roy Blunt, as well as a former governor and current state attorney general.“It breaks my heart that this is happening to him,” says Tom Mundell, a Silver Star and Purple Heart recipient who focuses on marijuana reform from a veterans and PTSD perspective. “He was doing a lot to give people who had never had a break in their life the opportunity to have generational wealth through the hemp industry.”But authorities allege that Thampy had a side hustle to his political work. They claim in the indictment that between January 2015 and September 2018, he was part of a drug distribution network connected to Roberts.According to a DEA agent’s affidavit, before Roberts’ death, he was receiving marijuana from Oregon via a middleman who had been a DEA informant in the past and who supplied Roberts “with 280 to 350 pounds of marijuana every three to four weeks” for about nine months up until his death. After Roberts was killed, the middleman began cooperating with the feds again and arranged for an especially large shipment of marijuana to be sent from Oregon to Missouri, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit. Authorities intercepted some 1,800 pounds of high-grade weed from a commercial trailer in Wyoming and arrested Craig Smith of Oregon, Roberts’ alleged supplier. Among other things, the indictment charges in a separate count that Smith and Thampy sought to sell a smaller amount of marijuana in February of last year.Authorities have charged seven others, including a Columbia mother and son who allegedly used drug-dealing proceeds to purchase, among other things, a flamethrower. Court documents allege one of the defendants donated $1,000 in drug money to Better Way Missouri, a political action committee represented by Thampy. Thampy, who is free pending trial next year, declined to comment for this article, and calls to his attorney were not Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges

Náhled

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastOn the evening of Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, residents of a country-club neighborhood in Columbia, Missouri, went to bed unaware that one of their neighbors had nearly 1,000 pounds of high-grade Oregon marijuana parked in the driveway outside his home.  The home was being rented by 28-year-old Augustus “Gus” Roberts, the son of a circuit court judge. Under the cover of darkness, several suspects forced their way inside, murdered him, and made off with the weed-filled U-Haul.The killers didn’t go far, abandoning the U-Haul at the end of the neighborhood’s cul-de-sac. Police arrived to find Roberts outside, near his driveway, dead of an apparent gunshot wound. They also found 94 pounds of weed and 3,000 THC oil pens used for vaping in the trailer and in Roberts’ bedroom closet. In the year and a half since, nine people have been arrested as a result of the homicide investigation—though none of them has been charged with committing that crime. Instead, law enforcement officials have rounded up a collection of Roberts’ alleged co-conspirators on drug-related counts.The highest-profile bust was Eapen Thampy, a well-known lobbyist around the state Capitol whose chief issue has been marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform—and who is now accused of being part of a network that distributed more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana over three years. The charges—which stem from the Roberts investigation, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit—could put Thampy in prison for life.It’s not lost on supporters of marijuana policy reform that Roberts’ death was precisely the type of violence that they believe legalization would prevent. “Once you have organized crime you have people taking matters into their own hands,” says Steve Fox, president of VS Strategies and a longtime D.C.-based marijuana policy reform advocate. “The same issues you had associated with alcohol prohibition in the early part of the last century, with organized crime and violence—those things largely, if not entirely, go away once the substance in question is legal and regulated.”In 2015, at the age of 31, Thampy founded Heartland Priorities, an organization that lobbies for marijuana legalization. He occupied a distinctive niche in the effort by arguing for reform from a right-wing and Libertarian perspective to a state legislature controlled by a Republican super-majority. He regularly appeared on talk radio throughout the state and beat the drum for individual liberty as a basis for legal weed and for criminal justice and sentencing reform. He’s been photographed with Sens. Rand Paul and Roy Blunt, as well as a former governor and current state attorney general.“It breaks my heart that this is happening to him,” says Tom Mundell, a Silver Star and Purple Heart recipient who focuses on marijuana reform from a veterans and PTSD perspective. “He was doing a lot to give people who had never had a break in their life the opportunity to have generational wealth through the hemp industry.”But authorities allege that Thampy had a side hustle to his political work. They claim in the indictment that between January 2015 and September 2018, he was part of a drug distribution network connected to Roberts.According to a DEA agent’s affidavit, before Roberts’ death, he was receiving marijuana from Oregon via a middleman who had been a DEA informant in the past and who supplied Roberts “with 280 to 350 pounds of marijuana every three to four weeks” for about nine months up until his death. After Roberts was killed, the middleman began cooperating with the feds again and arranged for an especially large shipment of marijuana to be sent from Oregon to Missouri, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit. Authorities intercepted some 1,800 pounds of high-grade weed from a commercial trailer in Wyoming and arrested Craig Smith of Oregon, Roberts’ alleged supplier. Among other things, the indictment charges in a separate count that Smith and Thampy sought to sell a smaller amount of marijuana in February of last year.Authorities have charged seven others, including a Columbia mother and son who allegedly used drug-dealing proceeds to purchase, among other things, a flamethrower. Court documents allege one of the defendants donated $1,000 in drug money to Better Way Missouri, a political action committee represented by Thampy. Thampy, who is free pending trial next year, declined to comment for this article, and calls to his attorney were not Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges

Náhled

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastOn the evening of Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, residents of a country-club neighborhood in Columbia, Missouri, went to bed unaware that one of their neighbors had nearly 1,000 pounds of high-grade Oregon marijuana parked in the driveway outside his home.  The home was being rented by 28-year-old Augustus “Gus” Roberts, the son of a circuit court judge. Under the cover of darkness, several suspects forced their way inside, murdered him, and made off with the weed-filled U-Haul.The killers didn’t go far, abandoning the U-Haul at the end of the neighborhood’s cul-de-sac. Police arrived to find Roberts outside, near his driveway, dead of an apparent gunshot wound. They also found 94 pounds of weed and 3,000 THC oil pens used for vaping in the trailer and in Roberts’ bedroom closet. In the year and a half since, nine people have been arrested as a result of the homicide investigation—though none of them has been charged with committing that crime. Instead, law enforcement officials have rounded up a collection of Roberts’ alleged co-conspirators on drug-related counts.The highest-profile bust was Eapen Thampy, a well-known lobbyist around the state Capitol whose chief issue has been marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform—and who is now accused of being part of a network that distributed more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana over three years. The charges—which stem from the Roberts investigation, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit—could put Thampy in prison for life.It’s not lost on supporters of marijuana policy reform that Roberts’ death was precisely the type of violence that they believe legalization would prevent. “Once you have organized crime you have people taking matters into their own hands,” says Steve Fox, president of VS Strategies and a longtime D.C.-based marijuana policy reform advocate. “The same issues you had associated with alcohol prohibition in the early part of the last century, with organized crime and violence—those things largely, if not entirely, go away once the substance in question is legal and regulated.”In 2015, at the age of 31, Thampy founded Heartland Priorities, an organization that lobbies for marijuana legalization. He occupied a distinctive niche in the effort by arguing for reform from a right-wing and Libertarian perspective to a state legislature controlled by a Republican super-majority. He regularly appeared on talk radio throughout the state and beat the drum for individual liberty as a basis for legal weed and for criminal justice and sentencing reform. He’s been photographed with Sens. Rand Paul and Roy Blunt, as well as a former governor and current state attorney general.“It breaks my heart that this is happening to him,” says Tom Mundell, a Silver Star and Purple Heart recipient who focuses on marijuana reform from a veterans and PTSD perspective. “He was doing a lot to give people who had never had a break in their life the opportunity to have generational wealth through the hemp industry.”But authorities allege that Thampy had a side hustle to his political work. They claim in the indictment that between January 2015 and September 2018, he was part of a drug distribution network connected to Roberts.According to a DEA agent’s affidavit, before Roberts’ death, he was receiving marijuana from Oregon via a middleman who had been a DEA informant in the past and who supplied Roberts “with 280 to 350 pounds of marijuana every three to four weeks” for about nine months up until his death. After Roberts was killed, the middleman began cooperating with the feds again and arranged for an especially large shipment of marijuana to be sent from Oregon to Missouri, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit. Authorities intercepted some 1,800 pounds of high-grade weed from a commercial trailer in Wyoming and arrested Craig Smith of Oregon, Roberts’ alleged supplier. Among other things, the indictment charges in a separate count that Smith and Thampy sought to sell a smaller amount of marijuana in February of last year.Authorities have charged seven others, including a Columbia mother and son who allegedly used drug-dealing proceeds to purchase, among other things, a flamethrower. Court documents allege one of the defendants donated $1,000 in drug money to Better Way Missouri, a political action committee represented by Thampy. Thampy, who is free pending trial next year, declined to comment for this article, and calls to his attorney were not Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges

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How an Unsolved Murder Got Legal Weed Lobbyist Eapen Thampy Indicted on Drug Charges Photo Illustration by The Daily BeastOn the evening of Sunday, Dec. 10, 2017, residents of a country-club neighborhood in Columbia, Missouri, went to bed unaware that one of their neighbors had nearly 1,000 pounds of high-grade Oregon marijuana parked in the driveway outside his home.  The home was being rented by 28-year-old Augustus “Gus” Roberts, the son of a circuit court judge. Under the cover of darkness, several suspects forced their way inside, murdered him, and made off with the weed-filled U-Haul.The killers didn’t go far, abandoning the U-Haul at the end of the neighborhood’s cul-de-sac. Police arrived to find Roberts outside, near his driveway, dead of an apparent gunshot wound. They also found 94 pounds of weed and 3,000 THC oil pens used for vaping in the trailer and in Roberts’ bedroom closet. In the year and a half since, nine people have been arrested as a result of the homicide investigation—though none of them has been charged with committing that crime. Instead, law enforcement officials have rounded up a collection of Roberts’ alleged co-conspirators on drug-related counts.The highest-profile bust was Eapen Thampy, a well-known lobbyist around the state Capitol whose chief issue has been marijuana legalization and criminal justice reform—and who is now accused of being part of a network that distributed more than 2,200 pounds of marijuana over three years. The charges—which stem from the Roberts investigation, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit—could put Thampy in prison for life.It’s not lost on supporters of marijuana policy reform that Roberts’ death was precisely the type of violence that they believe legalization would prevent. “Once you have organized crime you have people taking matters into their own hands,” says Steve Fox, president of VS Strategies and a longtime D.C.-based marijuana policy reform advocate. “The same issues you had associated with alcohol prohibition in the early part of the last century, with organized crime and violence—those things largely, if not entirely, go away once the substance in question is legal and regulated.”In 2015, at the age of 31, Thampy founded Heartland Priorities, an organization that lobbies for marijuana legalization. He occupied a distinctive niche in the effort by arguing for reform from a right-wing and Libertarian perspective to a state legislature controlled by a Republican super-majority. He regularly appeared on talk radio throughout the state and beat the drum for individual liberty as a basis for legal weed and for criminal justice and sentencing reform. He’s been photographed with Sens. Rand Paul and Roy Blunt, as well as a former governor and current state attorney general.“It breaks my heart that this is happening to him,” says Tom Mundell, a Silver Star and Purple Heart recipient who focuses on marijuana reform from a veterans and PTSD perspective. “He was doing a lot to give people who had never had a break in their life the opportunity to have generational wealth through the hemp industry.”But authorities allege that Thampy had a side hustle to his political work. They claim in the indictment that between January 2015 and September 2018, he was part of a drug distribution network connected to Roberts.According to a DEA agent’s affidavit, before Roberts’ death, he was receiving marijuana from Oregon via a middleman who had been a DEA informant in the past and who supplied Roberts “with 280 to 350 pounds of marijuana every three to four weeks” for about nine months up until his death. After Roberts was killed, the middleman began cooperating with the feds again and arranged for an especially large shipment of marijuana to be sent from Oregon to Missouri, according to a DEA agent’s affidavit. Authorities intercepted some 1,800 pounds of high-grade weed from a commercial trailer in Wyoming and arrested Craig Smith of Oregon, Roberts’ alleged supplier. Among other things, the indictment charges in a separate count that Smith and Thampy sought to sell a smaller amount of marijuana in February of last year.Authorities have charged seven others, including a Columbia mother and son who allegedly used drug-dealing proceeds to purchase, among other things, a flamethrower. Court documents allege one of the defendants donated $1,000 in drug money to Better Way Missouri, a political action committee represented by Thampy. Thampy, who is free pending trial next year, declined to comment for this article, and calls to his attorney were not Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

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