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Male lizards wrestle in the water over mating rights to desirable female

Náhled

Two male monitor lizards wrestle in the water - in a fight over the mating rights to a desirable female. The pair of randy reptiles were seen rolling around in the water at a park in Bangkok, central Thailand, last Monday (September 9). They spent several minutes entwined as they tried to use their strength to overpower the other one. The winner of the dual would be given a pass to mate with a female monitor lizard on heat, while the loser would skulk back into life as a bachelor. Amateur photographer Anake Seenadee, 43, captured the unusual scene while he was relaxing in the park watching the wildlife. He said: ''I was surprised to see this and at first, I thought they were mating. ''But then after I had done some research about their behaviour I understood that this was a fight over which male could mate with a woman. ''Both of the lizards looked very tired so I think she must have been a very sought-after female lizard.'' Male monitor lizards usually fight over two things - females and territory. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Male lizards wrestle in the water over mating rights to desirable female

Náhled

Two male monitor lizards wrestle in the water - in a fight over the mating rights to a desirable female. The pair of randy reptiles were seen rolling around in the water at a park in Bangkok, central Thailand, last Monday (September 9). They spent several minutes entwined as they tried to use their strength to overpower the other one. The winner of the dual would be given a pass to mate with a female monitor lizard on heat, while the loser would skulk back into life as a bachelor. Amateur photographer Anake Seenadee, 43, captured the unusual scene while he was relaxing in the park watching the wildlife. He said: ''I was surprised to see this and at first, I thought they were mating. ''But then after I had done some research about their behaviour I understood that this was a fight over which male could mate with a woman. ''Both of the lizards looked very tired so I think she must have been a very sought-after female lizard.'' Male monitor lizards usually fight over two things - females and territory. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Kellie Allen on getting the Bug for ABODE project

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20.9.2019 12:36
mgwinnett
Music
Kellie Allen getting ABODE project

KELLIE ALLEN has already made a big impact in dance music, not only for her music but also for her work raising money for the ABODE project, building a school in Uganda. Dubbed as one to watch by none other than Steve Lawler, she has just released a new EP on German pioneer, Steve Bug’s […] Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America.

Náhled

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America. Courtesy Gerald BostockGerald Bostock relished doing his job. He was proud of helping young people. Until 2013 he worked for Clayton County, Georgia, managing the county’s CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) program, which trained and assigned volunteers to represent children who have experienced abuse or neglect in court proceedings.“Imagine having a job you love, that’s your dream job, and all of sudden losing it,” Bostock, 55, from Doraville, Georgia, told The Daily Beast. In 2013, Bostock was suddenly fired by Clayton County. Bostock claims it was because he is gay, the firing coming after it was revealed to colleagues that he played for a local gay softball league. He was also subject to homophobic slurs, he claims.Now Bostock’s case is one of three historic LGBTQ discrimination cases that will be heard at the Supreme Court on Oct. 8. (The Daily Beast reported on the other two cases, involving former funeral director Aimee Stephens and skydiver Donald Zarda, in detail recently.)Inside the Supreme Court Discrimination Cases That Could Change LGBTQ RightsIn all three cases, SCOTUS will consider—and ultimately adjudicate—whether current sex discrimination laws protect LGBTQ people from workplace discrimination. “For me it has been extremely emotional,” Bostock told The Daily Beast of the last six years of legal fighting. “I lost my livelihood, and my source of income. I even lost my medical insurance, and at a time I was just recovering from prostate cancer. It’s been a long six-year journey not only to clear my name, but also help make it so no one has to go to work in fear of being fired for who they are, how they identify, and who they love.”The lawyers in all three SCOTUS cases claim that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin, includes sexual orientation and gender identity, under the “sex” classification.All three cases represent as momentous a moment for LGBTQ rights and equality at the Supreme Court as the Defense of Marriage Act and marriage equality rulings did in 2013 and 2015, respectively.Two of the cases focus on gay-related discrimination and will be heard together—Bostock’s and Zarda’s. The case of Stephens, who alleges her employer discriminated against her because she is transgender, will be heard separately.The cases are being heard against the backdrop of the stymied passage of the Equality Act, which would enshrine anti-LGBTQ discrimination protections in federal law (28 states presently have no protections for LGBTQ employees). The act passed in the House of Representatives but has little chance of getting passed in a Republican-controlled Senate.Thomas J. Mew, partner at Buckley Beal in Atlanta and one of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast: “This is a landmark case because we’re in a situation where right now in too many parts of the country a gay or lesbian individual can marry their partner on Sunday and then be fired for their sexual orientation on Monday.”Mew said, “What this situation is screaming out for is a uniform federal standard, and application of the law that protects LGBTQ men and women. Whether the individual is protected or not from discrimination should never be contingent on the luck of the geographical draw.”As summarized by SCOTUSBlog, Bostock claimed that the county falsely accused him of mismanaging public money, when it really fired him for being gay.In the other cases, lower courts have delivered rulings in favor of Zarda and Stephens. But so far in Bostock’s case, a district court ruled that Title VII did not cover sexual orientation, a ruling upheld by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit—and so Bostock has brought his case to the Supreme Court.Brian J. Sutherland, partner at Buckley Beal and another of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast that the “plain language of the Civil Rights Act clearly applies to sexual orientation. You can’t consider a person’s sexual orientation without considering his or her sex, and you can’t consider a person’s sex when you’re making an employment decision against them.”A spokesperson for Clayton County, Georgia, told The Daily Beast they would not discuss the case, adding: “We do not comment on pending litigation.”Jennifer King, executive director of Georgia CASA, told The Daily Beast that the organization was aware of the Supreme Court case “and its potential to further Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America.

Náhled

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America. Courtesy Gerald BostockGerald Bostock relished doing his job. He was proud of helping young people. Until 2013 he worked for Clayton County, Georgia, managing the county’s CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) program, which trained and assigned volunteers to represent children who have experienced abuse or neglect in court proceedings.“Imagine having a job you love, that’s your dream job, and all of sudden losing it,” Bostock, 55, from Doraville, Georgia, told The Daily Beast. In 2013, Bostock was suddenly fired by Clayton County. Bostock claims it was because he is gay, the firing coming after it was revealed to colleagues that he played for a local gay softball league. He was also subject to homophobic slurs, he claims.Now Bostock’s case is one of three historic LGBTQ discrimination cases that will be heard at the Supreme Court on Oct. 8. (The Daily Beast reported on the other two cases, involving former funeral director Aimee Stephens and skydiver Donald Zarda, in detail recently.)Inside the Supreme Court Discrimination Cases That Could Change LGBTQ RightsIn all three cases, SCOTUS will consider—and ultimately adjudicate—whether current sex discrimination laws protect LGBTQ people from workplace discrimination. “For me it has been extremely emotional,” Bostock told The Daily Beast of the last six years of legal fighting. “I lost my livelihood, and my source of income. I even lost my medical insurance, and at a time I was just recovering from prostate cancer. It’s been a long six-year journey not only to clear my name, but also help make it so no one has to go to work in fear of being fired for who they are, how they identify, and who they love.”The lawyers in all three SCOTUS cases claim that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin, includes sexual orientation and gender identity, under the “sex” classification.All three cases represent as momentous a moment for LGBTQ rights and equality at the Supreme Court as the Defense of Marriage Act and marriage equality rulings did in 2013 and 2015, respectively.Two of the cases focus on gay-related discrimination and will be heard together—Bostock’s and Zarda’s. The case of Stephens, who alleges her employer discriminated against her because she is transgender, will be heard separately.The cases are being heard against the backdrop of the stymied passage of the Equality Act, which would enshrine anti-LGBTQ discrimination protections in federal law (28 states presently have no protections for LGBTQ employees). The act passed in the House of Representatives but has little chance of getting passed in a Republican-controlled Senate.Thomas J. Mew, partner at Buckley Beal in Atlanta and one of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast: “This is a landmark case because we’re in a situation where right now in too many parts of the country a gay or lesbian individual can marry their partner on Sunday and then be fired for their sexual orientation on Monday.”Mew said, “What this situation is screaming out for is a uniform federal standard, and application of the law that protects LGBTQ men and women. Whether the individual is protected or not from discrimination should never be contingent on the luck of the geographical draw.”As summarized by SCOTUSBlog, Bostock claimed that the county falsely accused him of mismanaging public money, when it really fired him for being gay.In the other cases, lower courts have delivered rulings in favor of Zarda and Stephens. But so far in Bostock’s case, a district court ruled that Title VII did not cover sexual orientation, a ruling upheld by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit—and so Bostock has brought his case to the Supreme Court.Brian J. Sutherland, partner at Buckley Beal and another of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast that the “plain language of the Civil Rights Act clearly applies to sexual orientation. You can’t consider a person’s sexual orientation without considering his or her sex, and you can’t consider a person’s sex when you’re making an employment decision against them.”A spokesperson for Clayton County, Georgia, told The Daily Beast they would not discuss the case, adding: “We do not comment on pending litigation.”Jennifer King, executive director of Georgia CASA, told The Daily Beast that the organization was aware of the Supreme Court case “and its potential to further Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America.

Náhled

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America. Courtesy Gerald BostockGerald Bostock relished doing his job. He was proud of helping young people. Until 2013 he worked for Clayton County, Georgia, managing the county’s CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) program, which trained and assigned volunteers to represent children who have experienced abuse or neglect in court proceedings.“Imagine having a job you love, that’s your dream job, and all of sudden losing it,” Bostock, 55, from Doraville, Georgia, told The Daily Beast. In 2013, Bostock was suddenly fired by Clayton County. Bostock claims it was because he is gay, the firing coming after it was revealed to colleagues that he played for a local gay softball league. He was also subject to homophobic slurs, he claims.Now Bostock’s case is one of three historic LGBTQ discrimination cases that will be heard at the Supreme Court on Oct. 8. (The Daily Beast reported on the other two cases, involving former funeral director Aimee Stephens and skydiver Donald Zarda, in detail recently.)Inside the Supreme Court Discrimination Cases That Could Change LGBTQ RightsIn all three cases, SCOTUS will consider—and ultimately adjudicate—whether current sex discrimination laws protect LGBTQ people from workplace discrimination. “For me it has been extremely emotional,” Bostock told The Daily Beast of the last six years of legal fighting. “I lost my livelihood, and my source of income. I even lost my medical insurance, and at a time I was just recovering from prostate cancer. It’s been a long six-year journey not only to clear my name, but also help make it so no one has to go to work in fear of being fired for who they are, how they identify, and who they love.”The lawyers in all three SCOTUS cases claim that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin, includes sexual orientation and gender identity, under the “sex” classification.All three cases represent as momentous a moment for LGBTQ rights and equality at the Supreme Court as the Defense of Marriage Act and marriage equality rulings did in 2013 and 2015, respectively.Two of the cases focus on gay-related discrimination and will be heard together—Bostock’s and Zarda’s. The case of Stephens, who alleges her employer discriminated against her because she is transgender, will be heard separately.The cases are being heard against the backdrop of the stymied passage of the Equality Act, which would enshrine anti-LGBTQ discrimination protections in federal law (28 states presently have no protections for LGBTQ employees). The act passed in the House of Representatives but has little chance of getting passed in a Republican-controlled Senate.Thomas J. Mew, partner at Buckley Beal in Atlanta and one of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast: “This is a landmark case because we’re in a situation where right now in too many parts of the country a gay or lesbian individual can marry their partner on Sunday and then be fired for their sexual orientation on Monday.”Mew said, “What this situation is screaming out for is a uniform federal standard, and application of the law that protects LGBTQ men and women. Whether the individual is protected or not from discrimination should never be contingent on the luck of the geographical draw.”As summarized by SCOTUSBlog, Bostock claimed that the county falsely accused him of mismanaging public money, when it really fired him for being gay.In the other cases, lower courts have delivered rulings in favor of Zarda and Stephens. But so far in Bostock’s case, a district court ruled that Title VII did not cover sexual orientation, a ruling upheld by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit—and so Bostock has brought his case to the Supreme Court.Brian J. Sutherland, partner at Buckley Beal and another of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast that the “plain language of the Civil Rights Act clearly applies to sexual orientation. You can’t consider a person’s sexual orientation without considering his or her sex, and you can’t consider a person’s sex when you’re making an employment decision against them.”A spokesperson for Clayton County, Georgia, told The Daily Beast they would not discuss the case, adding: “We do not comment on pending litigation.”Jennifer King, executive director of Georgia CASA, told The Daily Beast that the organization was aware of the Supreme Court case “and its potential to further Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America.

Náhled

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America. Courtesy Gerald BostockGerald Bostock relished doing his job. He was proud of helping young people. Until 2013 he worked for Clayton County, Georgia, managing the county’s CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) program, which trained and assigned volunteers to represent children who have experienced abuse or neglect in court proceedings.“Imagine having a job you love, that’s your dream job, and all of sudden losing it,” Bostock, 55, from Doraville, Georgia, told The Daily Beast. In 2013, Bostock was suddenly fired by Clayton County. Bostock claims it was because he is gay, the firing coming after it was revealed to colleagues that he played for a local gay softball league. He was also subject to homophobic slurs, he claims.Now Bostock’s case is one of three historic LGBTQ discrimination cases that will be heard at the Supreme Court on Oct. 8. (The Daily Beast reported on the other two cases, involving former funeral director Aimee Stephens and skydiver Donald Zarda, in detail recently.)Inside the Supreme Court Discrimination Cases That Could Change LGBTQ RightsIn all three cases, SCOTUS will consider—and ultimately adjudicate—whether current sex discrimination laws protect LGBTQ people from workplace discrimination. “For me it has been extremely emotional,” Bostock told The Daily Beast of the last six years of legal fighting. “I lost my livelihood, and my source of income. I even lost my medical insurance, and at a time I was just recovering from prostate cancer. It’s been a long six-year journey not only to clear my name, but also help make it so no one has to go to work in fear of being fired for who they are, how they identify, and who they love.”The lawyers in all three SCOTUS cases claim that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin, includes sexual orientation and gender identity, under the “sex” classification.All three cases represent as momentous a moment for LGBTQ rights and equality at the Supreme Court as the Defense of Marriage Act and marriage equality rulings did in 2013 and 2015, respectively.Two of the cases focus on gay-related discrimination and will be heard together—Bostock’s and Zarda’s. The case of Stephens, who alleges her employer discriminated against her because she is transgender, will be heard separately.The cases are being heard against the backdrop of the stymied passage of the Equality Act, which would enshrine anti-LGBTQ discrimination protections in federal law (28 states presently have no protections for LGBTQ employees). The act passed in the House of Representatives but has little chance of getting passed in a Republican-controlled Senate.Thomas J. Mew, partner at Buckley Beal in Atlanta and one of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast: “This is a landmark case because we’re in a situation where right now in too many parts of the country a gay or lesbian individual can marry their partner on Sunday and then be fired for their sexual orientation on Monday.”Mew said, “What this situation is screaming out for is a uniform federal standard, and application of the law that protects LGBTQ men and women. Whether the individual is protected or not from discrimination should never be contingent on the luck of the geographical draw.”As summarized by SCOTUSBlog, Bostock claimed that the county falsely accused him of mismanaging public money, when it really fired him for being gay.In the other cases, lower courts have delivered rulings in favor of Zarda and Stephens. But so far in Bostock’s case, a district court ruled that Title VII did not cover sexual orientation, a ruling upheld by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit—and so Bostock has brought his case to the Supreme Court.Brian J. Sutherland, partner at Buckley Beal and another of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast that the “plain language of the Civil Rights Act clearly applies to sexual orientation. You can’t consider a person’s sexual orientation without considering his or her sex, and you can’t consider a person’s sex when you’re making an employment decision against them.”A spokesperson for Clayton County, Georgia, told The Daily Beast they would not discuss the case, adding: “We do not comment on pending litigation.”Jennifer King, executive director of Georgia CASA, told The Daily Beast that the organization was aware of the Supreme Court case “and its potential to further Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America.

Náhled

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America. Courtesy Gerald BostockGerald Bostock relished doing his job. He was proud of helping young people. Until 2013 he worked for Clayton County, Georgia, managing the county’s CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) program, which trained and assigned volunteers to represent children who have experienced abuse or neglect in court proceedings.“Imagine having a job you love, that’s your dream job, and all of sudden losing it,” Bostock, 55, from Doraville, Georgia, told The Daily Beast. In 2013, Bostock was suddenly fired by Clayton County. Bostock claims it was because he is gay, the firing coming after it was revealed to colleagues that he played for a local gay softball league. He was also subject to homophobic slurs, he claims.Now Bostock’s case is one of three historic LGBTQ discrimination cases that will be heard at the Supreme Court on Oct. 8. (The Daily Beast reported on the other two cases, involving former funeral director Aimee Stephens and skydiver Donald Zarda, in detail recently.)Inside the Supreme Court Discrimination Cases That Could Change LGBTQ RightsIn all three cases, SCOTUS will consider—and ultimately adjudicate—whether current sex discrimination laws protect LGBTQ people from workplace discrimination. “For me it has been extremely emotional,” Bostock told The Daily Beast of the last six years of legal fighting. “I lost my livelihood, and my source of income. I even lost my medical insurance, and at a time I was just recovering from prostate cancer. It’s been a long six-year journey not only to clear my name, but also help make it so no one has to go to work in fear of being fired for who they are, how they identify, and who they love.”The lawyers in all three SCOTUS cases claim that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin, includes sexual orientation and gender identity, under the “sex” classification.All three cases represent as momentous a moment for LGBTQ rights and equality at the Supreme Court as the Defense of Marriage Act and marriage equality rulings did in 2013 and 2015, respectively.Two of the cases focus on gay-related discrimination and will be heard together—Bostock’s and Zarda’s. The case of Stephens, who alleges her employer discriminated against her because she is transgender, will be heard separately.The cases are being heard against the backdrop of the stymied passage of the Equality Act, which would enshrine anti-LGBTQ discrimination protections in federal law (28 states presently have no protections for LGBTQ employees). The act passed in the House of Representatives but has little chance of getting passed in a Republican-controlled Senate.Thomas J. Mew, partner at Buckley Beal in Atlanta and one of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast: “This is a landmark case because we’re in a situation where right now in too many parts of the country a gay or lesbian individual can marry their partner on Sunday and then be fired for their sexual orientation on Monday.”Mew said, “What this situation is screaming out for is a uniform federal standard, and application of the law that protects LGBTQ men and women. Whether the individual is protected or not from discrimination should never be contingent on the luck of the geographical draw.”As summarized by SCOTUSBlog, Bostock claimed that the county falsely accused him of mismanaging public money, when it really fired him for being gay.In the other cases, lower courts have delivered rulings in favor of Zarda and Stephens. But so far in Bostock’s case, a district court ruled that Title VII did not cover sexual orientation, a ruling upheld by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit—and so Bostock has brought his case to the Supreme Court.Brian J. Sutherland, partner at Buckley Beal and another of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast that the “plain language of the Civil Rights Act clearly applies to sexual orientation. You can’t consider a person’s sexual orientation without considering his or her sex, and you can’t consider a person’s sex when you’re making an employment decision against them.”A spokesperson for Clayton County, Georgia, told The Daily Beast they would not discuss the case, adding: “We do not comment on pending litigation.”Jennifer King, executive director of Georgia CASA, told The Daily Beast that the organization was aware of the Supreme Court case “and its potential to further Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America.

Náhled

Gerald Bostock Was Fired. He Wants His Supreme Court Case to Help Change LGBTQ Rights in America. Courtesy Gerald BostockGerald Bostock relished doing his job. He was proud of helping young people. Until 2013 he worked for Clayton County, Georgia, managing the county’s CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) program, which trained and assigned volunteers to represent children who have experienced abuse or neglect in court proceedings.“Imagine having a job you love, that’s your dream job, and all of sudden losing it,” Bostock, 55, from Doraville, Georgia, told The Daily Beast. In 2013, Bostock was suddenly fired by Clayton County. Bostock claims it was because he is gay, the firing coming after it was revealed to colleagues that he played for a local gay softball league. He was also subject to homophobic slurs, he claims.Now Bostock’s case is one of three historic LGBTQ discrimination cases that will be heard at the Supreme Court on Oct. 8. (The Daily Beast reported on the other two cases, involving former funeral director Aimee Stephens and skydiver Donald Zarda, in detail recently.)Inside the Supreme Court Discrimination Cases That Could Change LGBTQ RightsIn all three cases, SCOTUS will consider—and ultimately adjudicate—whether current sex discrimination laws protect LGBTQ people from workplace discrimination. “For me it has been extremely emotional,” Bostock told The Daily Beast of the last six years of legal fighting. “I lost my livelihood, and my source of income. I even lost my medical insurance, and at a time I was just recovering from prostate cancer. It’s been a long six-year journey not only to clear my name, but also help make it so no one has to go to work in fear of being fired for who they are, how they identify, and who they love.”The lawyers in all three SCOTUS cases claim that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, and national origin, includes sexual orientation and gender identity, under the “sex” classification.All three cases represent as momentous a moment for LGBTQ rights and equality at the Supreme Court as the Defense of Marriage Act and marriage equality rulings did in 2013 and 2015, respectively.Two of the cases focus on gay-related discrimination and will be heard together—Bostock’s and Zarda’s. The case of Stephens, who alleges her employer discriminated against her because she is transgender, will be heard separately.The cases are being heard against the backdrop of the stymied passage of the Equality Act, which would enshrine anti-LGBTQ discrimination protections in federal law (28 states presently have no protections for LGBTQ employees). The act passed in the House of Representatives but has little chance of getting passed in a Republican-controlled Senate.Thomas J. Mew, partner at Buckley Beal in Atlanta and one of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast: “This is a landmark case because we’re in a situation where right now in too many parts of the country a gay or lesbian individual can marry their partner on Sunday and then be fired for their sexual orientation on Monday.”Mew said, “What this situation is screaming out for is a uniform federal standard, and application of the law that protects LGBTQ men and women. Whether the individual is protected or not from discrimination should never be contingent on the luck of the geographical draw.”As summarized by SCOTUSBlog, Bostock claimed that the county falsely accused him of mismanaging public money, when it really fired him for being gay.In the other cases, lower courts have delivered rulings in favor of Zarda and Stephens. But so far in Bostock’s case, a district court ruled that Title VII did not cover sexual orientation, a ruling upheld by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit—and so Bostock has brought his case to the Supreme Court.Brian J. Sutherland, partner at Buckley Beal and another of Bostock’s attorneys, told The Daily Beast that the “plain language of the Civil Rights Act clearly applies to sexual orientation. You can’t consider a person’s sexual orientation without considering his or her sex, and you can’t consider a person’s sex when you’re making an employment decision against them.”A spokesperson for Clayton County, Georgia, told The Daily Beast they would not discuss the case, adding: “We do not comment on pending litigation.”Jennifer King, executive director of Georgia CASA, told The Daily Beast that the organization was aware of the Supreme Court case “and its potential to further Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

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NWOO.ORG

New World Order Oppositton

Agitace za štěstí nebo za trvalé katastrofy?

Daniel Novák 19.09.2019, 10:10

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Božena W. 19.09.2019, 10:00

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Přehled zpráv – RusVesna, RusNext 17.9.2019

Božena W. 19.09.2019, 09:50

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P.C.Roberts: Armageddon na obzoru?

Lubomír Man 17.09.2019, 20:05

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Exkurze do propagandistického skanzenu školství ČR

Daniel Novák 17.09.2019, 20:03

Pár slov úvodem Abych byl spravedlivý, tak dříve, než se budu věnovat tématům z výuky, je třeba nejprve uvést v jakých prostorách a v jakém prostředí žáci a studenti usedají do školních lavic ( nejen ) v ČR. Zatímco téměř všichni dospělí mluví o pohybu, prostoru, zdraví a čerstvém vzduchu, tak našim dětem dopřáváme přesný
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Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství

S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 12. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 08.12.2016, 12:37

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 11. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 28.11.2016, 15:53

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 10. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 23.11.2016, 01:35

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 9. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 16.11.2016, 13:26

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 8. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 08.11.2016, 11:57

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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Tomio Okamura

Tomio Okamura: Tomio Okamura ve Svobodném rádiu 17.9.2019.

Tomio Okamura 18.09.2019, 22:05

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: Mnoho lidí nemá ani na zuby.

Tomio Okamura 16.09.2019, 10:21

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Tomio Okamura: SPD nepodpořilo rozšíření NATO o Severní Makedonii.

Tomio Okamura 13.09.2019, 20:47

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Tomio Okamura: NE zavedení evropského žalobce.

Tomio Okamura 12.09.2019, 18:25

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Tomio Okamura: Budou se navyšovat důchody.

Tomio Okamura 11.09.2019, 21:11

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Česká televize

StarDance jede za Vámi! Flashmob

Česká televize 13.09.2019, 13:45

Doražte na jednu z našich událostí StarDance do Ostravy, Brna, či Hradce Králové a zúčastněte se tak naprosto originálního flashmobu. Jak se na něj připravit naleznete ve videu. 🕺 Odkazy na jednotlivé akce: ▶️27. 9. Ostrava https://www.facebook.com/events/714784212339612/ ▶️28. 9. Brno https://www.facebook.com/events/694771571022939/ ▶️29. 9. Hradec Králové https://www.facebook.com/events/382608159357237/
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REPORTÉŘI ČT - Proč věří návštěvníci Čapího hnízda premiérovi

Česká televize 12.09.2019, 10:01

Anketa pořadu Reprotéři ČT s návštěvníky Čapího hnízda. Celý díl pořadu Reportéři ČT sledujte na iVysilani a nebo zde v odkazech. https://www.ceskatelevize.cz/porady/1142743803-reporteri-ct/219452801240026/video/718068 https://www.facebook.com/reporterict/videos/2262678957192058/ Sledujet nás na našich sociálních sítích: FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/reporterict/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/reporterict WEB: https://www.ceskatelevize.cz/reporterict #teaser #babis #navstevnici #capihnizdo
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Reportéři ČT - Fiala M., Paclíková A. - Horká planeta

Česká televize 10.09.2019, 11:05

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Paclíková A., Srnka V. - V rybníčku pana kancléře

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Paclíková A., Srnka V. - Příběh jednoho podnámu

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Vy tanky, my branky

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Ve šroubovici Přemyslovců

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Dědečci

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Ve jménu národa

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Kutilová M, Klicperová L - Vzpoura běženců

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57
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ParlamentníListy.cz

ParlamentníListy.cz

Česká politická scéna jako na dlani

Zeman na něj se*e! Schwarzenberg se pořádně rozjel, fanoušek si přál Zemanovu smrt

21.09.2019, 07:45

Čestný předseda TOP 09 Karel Schwarzenberg na svém facebooku uhodil na prezidenta Miloše Zemana. „Zeman sere na Zemana,“ nešetřil Schwarzenberg vulgarismy, když popisoval počínání prezidenta vůči nejvyššímu státnímu zástupci Pavlu Zemanovi. „Prezident vzkázal, že ho vůbec nezajímá, jaké argumenty nejvyšší státní zástupce Pavel Zeman ve svém konečném rozhodnutí, na které má tři měsíce čas, přinese a jaké důkazy zohlední. Tímto mu vzkázal, že tak či onak svého poddaného premiéra vytáhne z bryndy a že to všechno může zahodit do koše, protože tady vládne on, prezident,“ píše Schwarzenberg. Že by však slova prezidenta Miloše Zemana o případné abolici měla na posuzování rozhodnutí o zastavení stíhání premiéra Andreje Babiše (ANO) vliv, mezitím Nejvyšší státní zastupitelství vyloučilo.
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Lžou nám o vodě. Lobbisté proklouzli až do Bruselu. A česká média? Tvůrci polopravd v rukou oligarchů

21.09.2019, 04:44

PRAVDA O VODĚ Média v ČR nefungují jako pojistka demokracie a svět ověřených informací, říká předseda Nadačního fondu Pravda o vodě inženýr Radek Novotný. Proč se o české vodě šířily zavádějící informace a polopravdy? Kdo bohatne na české vodě, jak se k vodě staví Evropská unie a co je to „tunel na konci tunelu“, který podle Novotného v souvislosti s distribucí vody hrozí na severu Čech. To a více odhaluje ve třetím díle seriálu rozhovorů s ParlamentnímiListy.cz věnovaných české vodě.
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Hovado, kokoti! Milion chvilek jde do zbraně. Něco se chystá. Chvilkaři mají pro Zemana různá přání

20.09.2019, 20:21

Milion chvilek na svůj facebook napsal nabídku práce. „A je to tady. Prezident Zeman se naprosto zesměšnil,“ napsali. A reakce? „Jste jedním z největších štváčů v této zemi. Najděte si holku,“ zaznělo z diskuse. Chvilkaři mobilizují k prý největší demonstraci, jakou naše země zažila. V listopadu, nebo dřív?
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Skála (KSČM): „Sochám jde po krku jen Talibán a jeho klony na Ukrajině a v Praze 6.“ Filipův rival cupuje i krizi KSČM. Nešetří ani „zmijí jazyky“, „syčící na účastníky cesty na Krym“

20.09.2019, 21:53

ROZHOVOR Být komunistou má pádnější důvody než kdy dřív, říká výrazná tvář KSČM, Josef Skála. Právě ty ovšem tam, kde se to čeká především, neznějí už dlouhé roky. Lídr rebelů přibližuje program, jímž chtějí zvrátit volný pád výsledků KSČM.
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Halíka i Němcovou „dám“, ale tohle ne. Dílko, ze kterého trapnost tryskala, vrací se Tomáš Vyoral k ostudě České televize

20.09.2019, 17:12

PÁTEČNÍ ZÚČTOVÁNÍ TOMÁŠE VYORALA Komentátor Tomáš Vyoral se opět pustil do žhavých témat z uplynulého týdne. Ohodnotil tak třeba nový pořad České televize „To se ví“. Sledování tohoto pořadu prý bylo „nejtěžším kalibrem“ a „trapnost tryskala proudem“. Takový pořad by dle něj snad „horko těžko vypotili i bolševici“ a „potomci tvůrců a aktérů se budou stydět až do osmého kolene“. Řeč pak přišla i na „postiženou záškolačku“ Gretu Thunbergovou a její následovníky v Česku včele s Evou Holubovou. Vyoral se na klimatické demonstrace již připravuje. „Už píšu transparent ‚Greta zvítězí nad lží a nenávistí‘, samozřejmě v angličtině, a na netu jsem si objednal vlajku EU,“ podotýká. A nit nezůstala suchá ani na ministru zahraničí Tomáši Petříčkovi.
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Zvědavec

Skládáme střípky informací

Bezdrátová síť 5G: směšná kamufláž globální nadvlády

Jon Rappoport 20.09.2019, 01:10

Nejprve uvedu pár citací, abych vás uvedl do problematiky. Rychlost sítě 5G - to je dobré pro lidi, kteří si musí stáhnout celou řadu svého oblíbeného televizního pořadu za dvě vteřiny: „Je to další (pátá) generace mobilní technologie, která slibuje výrazné zvýšení rychlosti, pokrytí a responzivitu bezdrátových sítí. O jak velké rychlosti zde mluvíme? Představte si 10 až 100krát větší rychlost, než je vaše běžné mobilní připojení, a dokonce ještě rychlejší, než cokoli, ​​co lze získat pomocí fyzického kabelu z optických vláken, který máte zavedený doma. (Budete si tak moci stáhnout celou řadu televizního seriálu, jako je např. „Stranger Things“, za pár vteřin.)“ [CNET.com]
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Vzdělávání je problém?

Milan Javůrek 19.09.2019, 01:10

V posledních dnech bylo z Ministerstva školství oznámeno, že je třeba proškrtat až na padesát procent výukové okruhy. Prý jsou příliš obsáhlé, neodrážejí stálé změny v našem poznání – a hlavně se to nedá časově zvládnout a procvičit. To, že díky propagované inkluzi se výrazně zpomalilo tempo výuky, to již zmíněno nebylo. Dříve také pro účely procvičení byly používány domácí úkoly, ale i to je dnes překonáno – vyučující si tak nepřidávají práci navíc k radosti žáků i rodičů.
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Soud EU omezil tranzit plynu přes „Nord Stream“

Autor neuveden 18.09.2019, 01:10

Evropský soudní dvůr připravil „Gazprom“ o možnost využívat celkovou kapacitu plynovodu Opal, který plní funkci jedné z pozemních částí plynovodu „Nord Stream“ (čes. Severní proud). Informovalo o tom polské ministerstvo energetiky.
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Kozel zahradníkem

Jaroslav Tichý 17.09.2019, 01:10

Před nedávnem došlo po velkých a nesmyslných tahanicích způsobených nestandardním postupem předsedy ČSSD v souvislosti s výměnou nominanta ČSSD na pozici ministra kultury ke jmenování L. Zaorálka na tento post. Prý proto, že jde o zkušeného ministra. Je-li tomu tak, pak nepotřebuje žádných 100 dní hájení. Pojďme se tedy podívat již nyní na počínání nového pana ministra po jeho nástupu do funkce. Stihl toho již docela dost.
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Fake news posloužily k ospravedlnění totální války: výmysl o bosensko-srbském „táboru smrti“

Autor neuveden 16.09.2019, 01:10

Poprvé publikováno na webu Global Research 15. července 2015. Článek je staršího data, zařazuji jej za poslední článek Michala Branda Alan Kurdi jako symbol, abych ukázal, že falešné a úmyslně naaranžované fotky, které hýbou veřejným míněním a mění směr událostí, nejsou neobvyklé. Mainstream sahá k těmto desinformacím často a beze studu. No, hlavně že na ČT1 běží ve chvíli, kdy toto píši (neděle 22:20) propagandistický pořad To se ví, který „zábavnou formou odhaluje „falešné zprávy“. Editor
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Alan Kurdi jako symbol

Michal Brand 14.09.2019, 01:10

K dnešní úvaze mne inspiroval komentář Tomáše Vyorala a jeho komentář k Alanu Kurdimu a symbolice jeho smrti a fotky. Alan Kurdi, ten malý syrský chlapec, který se utopil v Egejském moři. Jeho fotografie oblétly svět. Měly to být fotografie, které změní svět, jak psala pro-migrantská propaganda. A svým způsobem to tak i být může. Alan Kurdi je totiž opravdu symbolem. Pojďme se podívat na jeho příběh. A na fakta. Připravte se na tvrdou, hořkou realitu – daleko horší, než líčila mas-mediální propaganda.
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Vtip a realita

Jaroslav Tichý 13.09.2019, 01:59

Podle některých odborných definic „vtip, anekdota, popřípadě fór, je krátké vyprávění, jehož účelem je pobavit příjemce (posluchače či čtenáře). Obvykle je založen na dvojznačnosti, absurditě nebo paradoxu, je stručný a směřuje k výrazné a úderné pointě. S ohledem na krátkost toho následujícího vyprávění zůstaňme u pojmu vtip. Příklad vtipu z filmu „Sedm statečných“: - muž vypadne z 10. patra činžáku; - a zatímco padá, v každém patře si říká, zatím je to v pořádku.
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Obchodní války jsou hrou blázna

Eric Margolis 12.09.2019, 01:10

Podle brilantního vojenského myslitele, generálmajora J.F.C. Fullera, „cílem války není vítězství. Je jím dosažení politických cílů.“ Věčná škoda, že prezident Donald Trump nečte knihy. Zahájil ekonomické války proti Číně, Rusku, Íránu, Kubě a Venezuele bez jakéhokoli jasného strategického cíle, až na to, že se nafouklo jeho ego coby světového předního vojenského vůdce, a že tyto státy potrestal za jejich neposlušnost.
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