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Desperate search for man who fell into Mexican sinkhole enters second week

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THE search for a missing man who fell into a sinkhole and disappeared will continue into a second week. The unidentified male was believed to have been swept away by underground water currents last Monday. Authorities in Hermosillo, Mexico, are trying to track down the man who could be trapped in drainage pipes. They have […] Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

‘Wall of secrecy’: Former ACCC tsar says transparency vanishing

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Average people are being forced to become whistleblowers, leaving them at risk of intimidation and financial loss, a former ACCC chair says. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Woman, 40, thought her boyfriend was dead when ‘guards dragged him away’ from luxury Tui resort in Mexico

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A TERRIFIED Brit claims she feared her boyfriend had been killed on their holiday in Mexico after no one told her he was dragged away to police cells. Stunned Sarah Hope says she was left “thinking the worst” after partner Dave Peden disappeared from their luxury hotel in Playa Del Carmen. Sarah, 39, has told […] Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich

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Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich (Bloomberg) -- Roberto the coyote can see a stretch of border fence from his ranch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, about a mile south of El Paso. Smuggling drugs and people to “el otro lado,” the other side, has been his life’s work.There’s always a way, he says, no matter how hard U.S. President Donald Trump tries to stop the flow. But this year’s crackdown has made it a tougher proposition. A deadlier one, too—especially for women and children, who are increasingly dying in the attempt.Not much surprises Roberto, who asks not to be identified by his surname because he engages in illegal activity. Sitting on a creaky metal chair, shaded by quince trees and speaking above the din from a gaggle of fighting roosters, the 65-year-old grabs a twig and scratches lines in the sand to show how he stays a step ahead of U.S. and Mexican security forces.Here’s a gap in the fence that migrants can dash through—onto land owned by American ranchers in his pay. There’s a spot U.S. patrols often pass, so he’s hiring more people to keep watch and cover any footprints with leaf-blowers.Roberto says he was taken aback in July this year, when he was approached for the first time by parents with young children. For coyotes, as the people-smugglers are known in Mexico, that wasn’t the typical customer profile. Roberto asked around among his peers. “They were also receiving a lot of families,” he says. “Many, many families are crossing over.”That helps explain one of the grimmer statistics to emerge from all the turmoil on the U.S.-Mexican border.Even more than usual, the 2,000-mile frontier has turned into a kind of tectonic fault line this year. Poverty and violence—and the pull of the world’s richest economy—are driving people north. At the border, they’re met by a new regime of tightened security and laws, imposed by Trump in tandem with his Mexican counterpart, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, also known as AMLO.Some give up and go home; some wait and hope—and some try evermore dangerous ways to get through.Nineteen children died during attempted crossings in the first nine months of 2019, by drowning, dehydration or illness, according to the UN’s “Missing Migrants” research project. That’s up from four reported through September 2018 and by far the most since the project began gathering data in 2014, when two died that entire year. Women are dying in greater numbers, too—44 in the year through September, versus 14 last year.Many of those families are fleeing crime epidemics in Central America, as well as economic shocks. Prices of coffee—a key export—in the region plunged this year to the lowest in more than a decade, crushing farmers.Making matters worse, climate change will produce more frequent crop failures for those growers that will, in turn, drive more migration, said Eleanor Paynter, a fellow at Ohio State University. “Asylum law does not currently recognize climate refugees,” she said, “but in the coming years we will see more and more.”The demand side is equally fluid. When the Great Recession hit in 2007, a slumping U.S. economy led to a sharp drop in arrivals from Mexico and Central America. Today, the reverse is true: Record-low unemployment in the U.S. is attracting huge numbers from Central America.But none of those factors fully explains why so many families are now willing to take such great risks. To understand that, it’s necessary to go back to the birth of the “Remain in Mexico” policy in January, when new U.S. rules made it much harder to seek asylum on arrival—and its escalation in June, when Trump threatened to slap tariffs on Mexican goods, and AMLO agreed to deploy 26,000 National Guard troops to the border.The crackdown was aimed at Central Americans—mostly from such poor, violent countries as El Salvador and Honduras—who’d been entering the U.S. through Mexico in growing numbers. Many would cross the border, turn themselves in and apply for asylum, then wait in the U.S. for a court hearing. That route was especially favored by migrants with young children, who were likely to be released from detention faster.Under the new policy, they were sent back to Mexico by the tens of thousands and required to wait in dangerous border towns for a court date. They might wait in shelters for months for their number to be called, with only 10 or 20 families being interviewed each day. Word was getting back that applications weren’t being approved, anyway.That pushed thousands of families into making a tough decision. Juan Fierro, who runs the El Buen Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich

Náhled

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich (Bloomberg) -- Roberto the coyote can see a stretch of border fence from his ranch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, about a mile south of El Paso. Smuggling drugs and people to “el otro lado,” the other side, has been his life’s work.There’s always a way, he says, no matter how hard U.S. President Donald Trump tries to stop the flow. But this year’s crackdown has made it a tougher proposition. A deadlier one, too—especially for women and children, who are increasingly dying in the attempt.Not much surprises Roberto, who asks not to be identified by his surname because he engages in illegal activity. Sitting on a creaky metal chair, shaded by quince trees and speaking above the din from a gaggle of fighting roosters, the 65-year-old grabs a twig and scratches lines in the sand to show how he stays a step ahead of U.S. and Mexican security forces.Here’s a gap in the fence that migrants can dash through—onto land owned by American ranchers in his pay. There’s a spot U.S. patrols often pass, so he’s hiring more people to keep watch and cover any footprints with leaf-blowers.Roberto says he was taken aback in July this year, when he was approached for the first time by parents with young children. For coyotes, as the people-smugglers are known in Mexico, that wasn’t the typical customer profile. Roberto asked around among his peers. “They were also receiving a lot of families,” he says. “Many, many families are crossing over.”That helps explain one of the grimmer statistics to emerge from all the turmoil on the U.S.-Mexican border.Even more than usual, the 2,000-mile frontier has turned into a kind of tectonic fault line this year. Poverty and violence—and the pull of the world’s richest economy—are driving people north. At the border, they’re met by a new regime of tightened security and laws, imposed by Trump in tandem with his Mexican counterpart, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, also known as AMLO.Some give up and go home; some wait and hope—and some try evermore dangerous ways to get through.Nineteen children died during attempted crossings in the first nine months of 2019, by drowning, dehydration or illness, according to the UN’s “Missing Migrants” research project. That’s up from four reported through September 2018 and by far the most since the project began gathering data in 2014, when two died that entire year. Women are dying in greater numbers, too—44 in the year through September, versus 14 last year.Many of those families are fleeing crime epidemics in Central America, as well as economic shocks. Prices of coffee—a key export—in the region plunged this year to the lowest in more than a decade, crushing farmers.Making matters worse, climate change will produce more frequent crop failures for those growers that will, in turn, drive more migration, said Eleanor Paynter, a fellow at Ohio State University. “Asylum law does not currently recognize climate refugees,” she said, “but in the coming years we will see more and more.”The demand side is equally fluid. When the Great Recession hit in 2007, a slumping U.S. economy led to a sharp drop in arrivals from Mexico and Central America. Today, the reverse is true: Record-low unemployment in the U.S. is attracting huge numbers from Central America.But none of those factors fully explains why so many families are now willing to take such great risks. To understand that, it’s necessary to go back to the birth of the “Remain in Mexico” policy in January, when new U.S. rules made it much harder to seek asylum on arrival—and its escalation in June, when Trump threatened to slap tariffs on Mexican goods, and AMLO agreed to deploy 26,000 National Guard troops to the border.The crackdown was aimed at Central Americans—mostly from such poor, violent countries as El Salvador and Honduras—who’d been entering the U.S. through Mexico in growing numbers. Many would cross the border, turn themselves in and apply for asylum, then wait in the U.S. for a court hearing. That route was especially favored by migrants with young children, who were likely to be released from detention faster.Under the new policy, they were sent back to Mexico by the tens of thousands and required to wait in dangerous border towns for a court date. They might wait in shelters for months for their number to be called, with only 10 or 20 families being interviewed each day. Word was getting back that applications weren’t being approved, anyway.That pushed thousands of families into making a tough decision. Juan Fierro, who runs the El Buen Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich

Náhled

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich (Bloomberg) -- Roberto the coyote can see a stretch of border fence from his ranch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, about a mile south of El Paso. Smuggling drugs and people to “el otro lado,” the other side, has been his life’s work.There’s always a way, he says, no matter how hard U.S. President Donald Trump tries to stop the flow. But this year’s crackdown has made it a tougher proposition. A deadlier one, too—especially for women and children, who are increasingly dying in the attempt.Not much surprises Roberto, who asks not to be identified by his surname because he engages in illegal activity. Sitting on a creaky metal chair, shaded by quince trees and speaking above the din from a gaggle of fighting roosters, the 65-year-old grabs a twig and scratches lines in the sand to show how he stays a step ahead of U.S. and Mexican security forces.Here’s a gap in the fence that migrants can dash through—onto land owned by American ranchers in his pay. There’s a spot U.S. patrols often pass, so he’s hiring more people to keep watch and cover any footprints with leaf-blowers.Roberto says he was taken aback in July this year, when he was approached for the first time by parents with young children. For coyotes, as the people-smugglers are known in Mexico, that wasn’t the typical customer profile. Roberto asked around among his peers. “They were also receiving a lot of families,” he says. “Many, many families are crossing over.”That helps explain one of the grimmer statistics to emerge from all the turmoil on the U.S.-Mexican border.Even more than usual, the 2,000-mile frontier has turned into a kind of tectonic fault line this year. Poverty and violence—and the pull of the world’s richest economy—are driving people north. At the border, they’re met by a new regime of tightened security and laws, imposed by Trump in tandem with his Mexican counterpart, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, also known as AMLO.Some give up and go home; some wait and hope—and some try evermore dangerous ways to get through.Nineteen children died during attempted crossings in the first nine months of 2019, by drowning, dehydration or illness, according to the UN’s “Missing Migrants” research project. That’s up from four reported through September 2018 and by far the most since the project began gathering data in 2014, when two died that entire year. Women are dying in greater numbers, too—44 in the year through September, versus 14 last year.Many of those families are fleeing crime epidemics in Central America, as well as economic shocks. Prices of coffee—a key export—in the region plunged this year to the lowest in more than a decade, crushing farmers.Making matters worse, climate change will produce more frequent crop failures for those growers that will, in turn, drive more migration, said Eleanor Paynter, a fellow at Ohio State University. “Asylum law does not currently recognize climate refugees,” she said, “but in the coming years we will see more and more.”The demand side is equally fluid. When the Great Recession hit in 2007, a slumping U.S. economy led to a sharp drop in arrivals from Mexico and Central America. Today, the reverse is true: Record-low unemployment in the U.S. is attracting huge numbers from Central America.But none of those factors fully explains why so many families are now willing to take such great risks. To understand that, it’s necessary to go back to the birth of the “Remain in Mexico” policy in January, when new U.S. rules made it much harder to seek asylum on arrival—and its escalation in June, when Trump threatened to slap tariffs on Mexican goods, and AMLO agreed to deploy 26,000 National Guard troops to the border.The crackdown was aimed at Central Americans—mostly from such poor, violent countries as El Salvador and Honduras—who’d been entering the U.S. through Mexico in growing numbers. Many would cross the border, turn themselves in and apply for asylum, then wait in the U.S. for a court hearing. That route was especially favored by migrants with young children, who were likely to be released from detention faster.Under the new policy, they were sent back to Mexico by the tens of thousands and required to wait in dangerous border towns for a court date. They might wait in shelters for months for their number to be called, with only 10 or 20 families being interviewed each day. Word was getting back that applications weren’t being approved, anyway.That pushed thousands of families into making a tough decision. Juan Fierro, who runs the El Buen Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich

Náhled

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich (Bloomberg) -- Roberto the coyote can see a stretch of border fence from his ranch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, about a mile south of El Paso. Smuggling drugs and people to “el otro lado,” the other side, has been his life’s work.There’s always a way, he says, no matter how hard U.S. President Donald Trump tries to stop the flow. But this year’s crackdown has made it a tougher proposition. A deadlier one, too—especially for women and children, who are increasingly dying in the attempt.Not much surprises Roberto, who asks not to be identified by his surname because he engages in illegal activity. Sitting on a creaky metal chair, shaded by quince trees and speaking above the din from a gaggle of fighting roosters, the 65-year-old grabs a twig and scratches lines in the sand to show how he stays a step ahead of U.S. and Mexican security forces.Here’s a gap in the fence that migrants can dash through—onto land owned by American ranchers in his pay. There’s a spot U.S. patrols often pass, so he’s hiring more people to keep watch and cover any footprints with leaf-blowers.Roberto says he was taken aback in July this year, when he was approached for the first time by parents with young children. For coyotes, as the people-smugglers are known in Mexico, that wasn’t the typical customer profile. Roberto asked around among his peers. “They were also receiving a lot of families,” he says. “Many, many families are crossing over.”That helps explain one of the grimmer statistics to emerge from all the turmoil on the U.S.-Mexican border.Even more than usual, the 2,000-mile frontier has turned into a kind of tectonic fault line this year. Poverty and violence—and the pull of the world’s richest economy—are driving people north. At the border, they’re met by a new regime of tightened security and laws, imposed by Trump in tandem with his Mexican counterpart, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, also known as AMLO.Some give up and go home; some wait and hope—and some try evermore dangerous ways to get through.Nineteen children died during attempted crossings in the first nine months of 2019, by drowning, dehydration or illness, according to the UN’s “Missing Migrants” research project. That’s up from four reported through September 2018 and by far the most since the project began gathering data in 2014, when two died that entire year. Women are dying in greater numbers, too—44 in the year through September, versus 14 last year.Many of those families are fleeing crime epidemics in Central America, as well as economic shocks. Prices of coffee—a key export—in the region plunged this year to the lowest in more than a decade, crushing farmers.Making matters worse, climate change will produce more frequent crop failures for those growers that will, in turn, drive more migration, said Eleanor Paynter, a fellow at Ohio State University. “Asylum law does not currently recognize climate refugees,” she said, “but in the coming years we will see more and more.”The demand side is equally fluid. When the Great Recession hit in 2007, a slumping U.S. economy led to a sharp drop in arrivals from Mexico and Central America. Today, the reverse is true: Record-low unemployment in the U.S. is attracting huge numbers from Central America.But none of those factors fully explains why so many families are now willing to take such great risks. To understand that, it’s necessary to go back to the birth of the “Remain in Mexico” policy in January, when new U.S. rules made it much harder to seek asylum on arrival—and its escalation in June, when Trump threatened to slap tariffs on Mexican goods, and AMLO agreed to deploy 26,000 National Guard troops to the border.The crackdown was aimed at Central Americans—mostly from such poor, violent countries as El Salvador and Honduras—who’d been entering the U.S. through Mexico in growing numbers. Many would cross the border, turn themselves in and apply for asylum, then wait in the U.S. for a court hearing. That route was especially favored by migrants with young children, who were likely to be released from detention faster.Under the new policy, they were sent back to Mexico by the tens of thousands and required to wait in dangerous border towns for a court date. They might wait in shelters for months for their number to be called, with only 10 or 20 families being interviewed each day. Word was getting back that applications weren’t being approved, anyway.That pushed thousands of families into making a tough decision. Juan Fierro, who runs the El Buen Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich

Náhled

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich (Bloomberg) -- Roberto the coyote can see a stretch of border fence from his ranch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, about a mile south of El Paso. Smuggling drugs and people to “el otro lado,” the other side, has been his life’s work.There’s always a way, he says, no matter how hard U.S. President Donald Trump tries to stop the flow. But this year’s crackdown has made it a tougher proposition. A deadlier one, too—especially for women and children, who are increasingly dying in the attempt.Not much surprises Roberto, who asks not to be identified by his surname because he engages in illegal activity. Sitting on a creaky metal chair, shaded by quince trees and speaking above the din from a gaggle of fighting roosters, the 65-year-old grabs a twig and scratches lines in the sand to show how he stays a step ahead of U.S. and Mexican security forces.Here’s a gap in the fence that migrants can dash through—onto land owned by American ranchers in his pay. There’s a spot U.S. patrols often pass, so he’s hiring more people to keep watch and cover any footprints with leaf-blowers.Roberto says he was taken aback in July this year, when he was approached for the first time by parents with young children. For coyotes, as the people-smugglers are known in Mexico, that wasn’t the typical customer profile. Roberto asked around among his peers. “They were also receiving a lot of families,” he says. “Many, many families are crossing over.”That helps explain one of the grimmer statistics to emerge from all the turmoil on the U.S.-Mexican border.Even more than usual, the 2,000-mile frontier has turned into a kind of tectonic fault line this year. Poverty and violence—and the pull of the world’s richest economy—are driving people north. At the border, they’re met by a new regime of tightened security and laws, imposed by Trump in tandem with his Mexican counterpart, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, also known as AMLO.Some give up and go home; some wait and hope—and some try evermore dangerous ways to get through.Nineteen children died during attempted crossings in the first nine months of 2019, by drowning, dehydration or illness, according to the UN’s “Missing Migrants” research project. That’s up from four reported through September 2018 and by far the most since the project began gathering data in 2014, when two died that entire year. Women are dying in greater numbers, too—44 in the year through September, versus 14 last year.Many of those families are fleeing crime epidemics in Central America, as well as economic shocks. Prices of coffee—a key export—in the region plunged this year to the lowest in more than a decade, crushing farmers.Making matters worse, climate change will produce more frequent crop failures for those growers that will, in turn, drive more migration, said Eleanor Paynter, a fellow at Ohio State University. “Asylum law does not currently recognize climate refugees,” she said, “but in the coming years we will see more and more.”The demand side is equally fluid. When the Great Recession hit in 2007, a slumping U.S. economy led to a sharp drop in arrivals from Mexico and Central America. Today, the reverse is true: Record-low unemployment in the U.S. is attracting huge numbers from Central America.But none of those factors fully explains why so many families are now willing to take such great risks. To understand that, it’s necessary to go back to the birth of the “Remain in Mexico” policy in January, when new U.S. rules made it much harder to seek asylum on arrival—and its escalation in June, when Trump threatened to slap tariffs on Mexican goods, and AMLO agreed to deploy 26,000 National Guard troops to the border.The crackdown was aimed at Central Americans—mostly from such poor, violent countries as El Salvador and Honduras—who’d been entering the U.S. through Mexico in growing numbers. Many would cross the border, turn themselves in and apply for asylum, then wait in the U.S. for a court hearing. That route was especially favored by migrants with young children, who were likely to be released from detention faster.Under the new policy, they were sent back to Mexico by the tens of thousands and required to wait in dangerous border towns for a court date. They might wait in shelters for months for their number to be called, with only 10 or 20 families being interviewed each day. Word was getting back that applications weren’t being approved, anyway.That pushed thousands of families into making a tough decision. Juan Fierro, who runs the El Buen Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich

Náhled

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich (Bloomberg) -- Roberto the coyote can see a stretch of border fence from his ranch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, about a mile south of El Paso. Smuggling drugs and people to “el otro lado,” the other side, has been his life’s work.There’s always a way, he says, no matter how hard U.S. President Donald Trump tries to stop the flow. But this year’s crackdown has made it a tougher proposition. A deadlier one, too—especially for women and children, who are increasingly dying in the attempt.Not much surprises Roberto, who asks not to be identified by his surname because he engages in illegal activity. Sitting on a creaky metal chair, shaded by quince trees and speaking above the din from a gaggle of fighting roosters, the 65-year-old grabs a twig and scratches lines in the sand to show how he stays a step ahead of U.S. and Mexican security forces.Here’s a gap in the fence that migrants can dash through—onto land owned by American ranchers in his pay. There’s a spot U.S. patrols often pass, so he’s hiring more people to keep watch and cover any footprints with leaf-blowers.Roberto says he was taken aback in July this year, when he was approached for the first time by parents with young children. For coyotes, as the people-smugglers are known in Mexico, that wasn’t the typical customer profile. Roberto asked around among his peers. “They were also receiving a lot of families,” he says. “Many, many families are crossing over.”That helps explain one of the grimmer statistics to emerge from all the turmoil on the U.S.-Mexican border.Even more than usual, the 2,000-mile frontier has turned into a kind of tectonic fault line this year. Poverty and violence—and the pull of the world’s richest economy—are driving people north. At the border, they’re met by a new regime of tightened security and laws, imposed by Trump in tandem with his Mexican counterpart, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, also known as AMLO.Some give up and go home; some wait and hope—and some try evermore dangerous ways to get through.Nineteen children died during attempted crossings in the first nine months of 2019, by drowning, dehydration or illness, according to the UN’s “Missing Migrants” research project. That’s up from four reported through September 2018 and by far the most since the project began gathering data in 2014, when two died that entire year. Women are dying in greater numbers, too—44 in the year through September, versus 14 last year.Many of those families are fleeing crime epidemics in Central America, as well as economic shocks. Prices of coffee—a key export—in the region plunged this year to the lowest in more than a decade, crushing farmers.Making matters worse, climate change will produce more frequent crop failures for those growers that will, in turn, drive more migration, said Eleanor Paynter, a fellow at Ohio State University. “Asylum law does not currently recognize climate refugees,” she said, “but in the coming years we will see more and more.”The demand side is equally fluid. When the Great Recession hit in 2007, a slumping U.S. economy led to a sharp drop in arrivals from Mexico and Central America. Today, the reverse is true: Record-low unemployment in the U.S. is attracting huge numbers from Central America.But none of those factors fully explains why so many families are now willing to take such great risks. To understand that, it’s necessary to go back to the birth of the “Remain in Mexico” policy in January, when new U.S. rules made it much harder to seek asylum on arrival—and its escalation in June, when Trump threatened to slap tariffs on Mexican goods, and AMLO agreed to deploy 26,000 National Guard troops to the border.The crackdown was aimed at Central Americans—mostly from such poor, violent countries as El Salvador and Honduras—who’d been entering the U.S. through Mexico in growing numbers. Many would cross the border, turn themselves in and apply for asylum, then wait in the U.S. for a court hearing. That route was especially favored by migrants with young children, who were likely to be released from detention faster.Under the new policy, they were sent back to Mexico by the tens of thousands and required to wait in dangerous border towns for a court date. They might wait in shelters for months for their number to be called, with only 10 or 20 families being interviewed each day. Word was getting back that applications weren’t being approved, anyway.That pushed thousands of families into making a tough decision. Juan Fierro, who runs the El Buen Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich

Náhled

Children Die at Record Speed on U.S. Border While Coyotes Get Rich (Bloomberg) -- Roberto the coyote can see a stretch of border fence from his ranch in Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, about a mile south of El Paso. Smuggling drugs and people to “el otro lado,” the other side, has been his life’s work.There’s always a way, he says, no matter how hard U.S. President Donald Trump tries to stop the flow. But this year’s crackdown has made it a tougher proposition. A deadlier one, too—especially for women and children, who are increasingly dying in the attempt.Not much surprises Roberto, who asks not to be identified by his surname because he engages in illegal activity. Sitting on a creaky metal chair, shaded by quince trees and speaking above the din from a gaggle of fighting roosters, the 65-year-old grabs a twig and scratches lines in the sand to show how he stays a step ahead of U.S. and Mexican security forces.Here’s a gap in the fence that migrants can dash through—onto land owned by American ranchers in his pay. There’s a spot U.S. patrols often pass, so he’s hiring more people to keep watch and cover any footprints with leaf-blowers.Roberto says he was taken aback in July this year, when he was approached for the first time by parents with young children. For coyotes, as the people-smugglers are known in Mexico, that wasn’t the typical customer profile. Roberto asked around among his peers. “They were also receiving a lot of families,” he says. “Many, many families are crossing over.”That helps explain one of the grimmer statistics to emerge from all the turmoil on the U.S.-Mexican border.Even more than usual, the 2,000-mile frontier has turned into a kind of tectonic fault line this year. Poverty and violence—and the pull of the world’s richest economy—are driving people north. At the border, they’re met by a new regime of tightened security and laws, imposed by Trump in tandem with his Mexican counterpart, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, also known as AMLO.Some give up and go home; some wait and hope—and some try evermore dangerous ways to get through.Nineteen children died during attempted crossings in the first nine months of 2019, by drowning, dehydration or illness, according to the UN’s “Missing Migrants” research project. That’s up from four reported through September 2018 and by far the most since the project began gathering data in 2014, when two died that entire year. Women are dying in greater numbers, too—44 in the year through September, versus 14 last year.Many of those families are fleeing crime epidemics in Central America, as well as economic shocks. Prices of coffee—a key export—in the region plunged this year to the lowest in more than a decade, crushing farmers.Making matters worse, climate change will produce more frequent crop failures for those growers that will, in turn, drive more migration, said Eleanor Paynter, a fellow at Ohio State University. “Asylum law does not currently recognize climate refugees,” she said, “but in the coming years we will see more and more.”The demand side is equally fluid. When the Great Recession hit in 2007, a slumping U.S. economy led to a sharp drop in arrivals from Mexico and Central America. Today, the reverse is true: Record-low unemployment in the U.S. is attracting huge numbers from Central America.But none of those factors fully explains why so many families are now willing to take such great risks. To understand that, it’s necessary to go back to the birth of the “Remain in Mexico” policy in January, when new U.S. rules made it much harder to seek asylum on arrival—and its escalation in June, when Trump threatened to slap tariffs on Mexican goods, and AMLO agreed to deploy 26,000 National Guard troops to the border.The crackdown was aimed at Central Americans—mostly from such poor, violent countries as El Salvador and Honduras—who’d been entering the U.S. through Mexico in growing numbers. Many would cross the border, turn themselves in and apply for asylum, then wait in the U.S. for a court hearing. That route was especially favored by migrants with young children, who were likely to be released from detention faster.Under the new policy, they were sent back to Mexico by the tens of thousands and required to wait in dangerous border towns for a court date. They might wait in shelters for months for their number to be called, with only 10 or 20 families being interviewed each day. Word was getting back that applications weren’t being approved, anyway.That pushed thousands of families into making a tough decision. Juan Fierro, who runs the El Buen Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

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NWOO.ORG

New World Order Oppositton

Petr Havel / Tomáš Ouhel – Klimatická krize? – Debatní klub

Debatní Klub 18.10.2019, 17:54

Do Debatního klubu na téma klimatické krize přijali pozvání pánové Tomáš Ouhel, ředitel světové ochranářské kampaně Silent Forest a Petr Havel, novinář a analytik zabývající se dlouhodobě zemědělstvím, potravinářstvím a životním prostředím. Téma klimatické krize se objevuje takřka pravidelně od 70 let minulého století. Již tehdy zaznívaly prognózy o brzkém konci světa, hladomorech, nedostatku vody,
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Nejsi politicky spolehlivý? Do basy s tebou!

Daniel Novák 18.10.2019, 17:46

Je Váš rodinný příslušník známá ( veřejně viditelná ) osobnost, jste na dovolené a ve známém letovisku dojde k otravě, Váš nadřízený způsobí škodu, zjistili jste něco citlivého o fungování polistopadové mafie nebo jen občas napíšete nekorektní ( tzv. ,,předsudečná nenávist“ ) komentář? Tak buďte na pozoru, protože se dostanete do hledáčku tzv. ,,orgánů činných
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Přehled zpráv – RusVesna, RusNext 17.10.2019

Božena W. 18.10.2019, 09:55

1; V OSN požadují, aby byla zrušena stránka Mirotvorec. Zástupce OSN připomněl zavraždění bývalého člena domobrany Romana Džumajeva v Mariupolu kvůli tomu, že jeho údaje byly zveřejněny na stránkách Mirotvorce. 2; Kulka zasáhla krk a vyšla z těla hrudníkem. Ostřelovač zlikvidoval karatele z brigády Ivana Serko. Podle informací tiskové služby 92. samostatné mechanizované brigády ukrajinské
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Slovensko – „Byť, či nebyť?“ Časť III. – Biely Tiger. Preživší Hitler. Europarlament. FUROR RUSSICUM.

Stanislav Slabeycius 17.10.2019, 21:51

„Ich werde Dich zerstoeren. Ich werde Dich vernichten! Du wirst NIE MEHR DEIN URTEIL OB DER ERDE RICHTEN!!!“ Roman Viktorov, „MEIN Faust“ „Jeden mozog dokáže viac, než miliarda dolárov!“ Fantomas alias GP   „Idu na Vy…“ Venujem svojmu starému otcovi, frontoviku, a taktiež všetkým, ktorí položili svoje životy, ale nedovolili fašizmu prejsť a nestratili svoju ľudskú
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Přehled zpráv – RusVesna, RusNext 16.10.2019

Božena W. 17.10.2019, 20:50

1; Člen Jarošovy ochranky vyhlásil hladovku v ruském vězení. Alexandr Šumkov,který si odpykává trest v Rusku, vyhlásil hladovku. 2; Erdogan sebevědomě odpověděl na Trumpův požadavek ohledně Sýrie. Erdogan prohlásil, že absolutně nemá v úmyslu řídit se výzvami USA. 3; Účastník ATO odjel na Donbas za svým milencem a byl zmlácen. Kyjev poprvé zahajuje proces na
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Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství

S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 12. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 08.12.2016, 12:37

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 11. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 28.11.2016, 15:53

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 10. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 23.11.2016, 01:35

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 9. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 16.11.2016, 13:26

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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S MUDr. Jonášem o zdraví - 8. díl

Kinosvět - záhady a tajemství 08.11.2016, 11:57

MUDr. Josef Jonáš, jeden z nejznámějších českých badatelů v oblasti přírodní a celostní medicíny, radí jak pečovat o své tělesné a vlastně i duševní zdraví.
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Tomio Okamura

Tomio Okamura: Ministr Hamáček hájí nepřizpůsobivé migranty.

Tomio Okamura 18.10.2019, 15:01

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: ČSSD podporuje migrační centra v ČR!

Tomio Okamura 18.10.2019, 14:07

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: Zoufalá ČSSD kope na všechny strany.

Tomio Okamura 18.10.2019, 10:04

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: Komu slouží vaše vláda, pane premiére?

Tomio Okamura 18.10.2019, 09:39

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Tomio Okamura: ČT záměrně tají negativní informace o svém hospodaření.

Tomio Okamura 17.10.2019, 20:14

Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/tomio.cz Sledujte: https://www.facebook.com/hnutispd
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Česká televize

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Kutilova M., Klicperova L. - Mezi migranty v Libyi

Česká televize 26.09.2019, 12:35

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Macháček David - Dvojí metr

Česká televize 26.09.2019, 12:34

StarDance jede za Vámi! Flashmob

Česká televize 13.09.2019, 13:45

Doražte na jednu z našich událostí StarDance do Ostravy, Brna, či Hradce Králové a zúčastněte se tak naprosto originálního flashmobu. Jak se na něj připravit naleznete ve videu. 🕺 Odkazy na jednotlivé akce: ▶️27. 9. Ostrava https://www.facebook.com/events/714784212339612/ ▶️28. 9. Brno https://www.facebook.com/events/694771571022939/ ▶️29. 9. Hradec Králové https://www.facebook.com/events/382608159357237/
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REPORTÉŘI ČT - Proč věří návštěvníci Čapího hnízda premiérovi

Česká televize 12.09.2019, 10:01

Anketa pořadu Reprotéři ČT s návštěvníky Čapího hnízda. Celý díl pořadu Reportéři ČT sledujte na iVysilani a nebo zde v odkazech. https://www.ceskatelevize.cz/porady/1142743803-reporteri-ct/219452801240026/video/718068 https://www.facebook.com/reporterict/videos/2262678957192058/ Sledujet nás na našich sociálních sítích: FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/reporterict/ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/reporterict WEB: https://www.ceskatelevize.cz/reporterict #teaser #babis #navstevnici #capihnizdo
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Reportéři ČT - Fiala M., Paclíková A. - Horká planeta

Česká televize 10.09.2019, 11:05

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Paclíková A., Srnka V. - V rybníčku pana kancléře

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Paclíková A., Srnka V. - Příběh jednoho podnámu

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Vy tanky, my branky

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Ve šroubovici Přemyslovců

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57

REPORTÉŘI ČT - Vondráček David - Dědečci

Česká televize 04.09.2019, 14:57
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ParlamentníListy.cz

ParlamentníListy.cz

Česká politická scéna jako na dlani

Kdyby Hutka směl... John Bok zúčtoval s Karlem Gottem i jeho posluchači. ,,Vymyté mozky”, padlo

21.10.2019, 04:44

ROZHOVOR „Mají pravdu ti, kdo zaujímají názor, že Karel Gott je odpustkem pro všechny, kdo tu žili se shrbenými zády a nechali si od bolševiků kálet na hlavu,“ říká aktivista John Bok. Zpěváka je mu ale přes veškerý životní úspěch líto, protože se po smrti stal materií, kdy si lidé mezi sebou vyrovnávají účty. Jedni zapomínají na jeho hříchy, a druzí, že byl lidská bytost. V rozhovoru pro ParlamentníListy.cz také komentoval dění kolem České televize, které vytkl komercionalizaci, reklamy a sponzorování výroby filmů, což se neslučuje s podstatou veřejnoprávních médií. John Bok rovněž označil skutečnost, že KSČM je legitimní politickou parlamentní stranou, za důkaz, jak se Češi nevypořádali se zločinným režimem a nesou v sobě zárodky této hrozné nákazy.
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Putin, to Putin! Sranda z Nory Fridrichové ve StarDance: Vážná slova

20.10.2019, 20:47

Moderátorka pořadu 168 hodin České televize Nora Fridrichová vypadla ze zábavného pořadu StarDance hned při prvním ostrém testu. Server Express.cz, který před lety koupil premiér Andrej Babiš, tvrdí, že Fridrichová ochutnala vlastní medicínu, kterou dává týden co týden okusit politikům. A publicista Tomáš Vyoral si ještě přisadil...
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„On není blbec.“ Slova o Donaldu Trumpovi narazila: Cenzura?

20.10.2019, 20:00

Publicista Dušan Neumann, který žije již 40 let v USA, vysvětlil, proč většina vojáků armády Spojených států stojí neochvějně za 45. prezidentem USA Donaldem Trumpem. Sdělil to serveru Kupředu do minulosti. Ale když chtěla publicistka Martina Kociánová upozornit na sociální síti Facebook, narazila. Možné vysvětlení, proč se to stalo, vás zřejmě překvapí...
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Ohrožená demokracie? Především proto, že v médiích se „tlačí“ jen „jediný správný“ názor, zahřmělo od Šichtařové

20.10.2019, 16:02

INVENTURA MARKÉTY ŠICHTAŘOVÉ Zatímco to, že někdo má děti, je jakási zásluha a pomůže to celé společnosti, to, že je někdo mladý, žádná osobní zásluha není, to se prostě jen tak nějak „přihodí“, k tomu není třeba žádná motivace. Tak reaguje Markéta Šichtařová na sliby ODS, že prosadí nulové zdanění rodičů a zrušení daně z příjmu pro lidi do 26 let. Ve své nové knize „S androidkou v posteli“ společně s manželem Vladimírem Pikorou ukazují, jak je demokracie v ohrožení také kvůli tomu, že v médiích začal být v určitém okamžiku upřednostňován jen „jediný správný“ názor.
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Po Xaverově odhalení další rána pro ČT. Poslanec Plzák se rozpovídal o pořadech Wollnera a Fridrichové

20.10.2019, 17:10

Poslanec hnutí ANO Pavel Plzák se v internetové televizi XTV pustil do veřejnoprávní České televize. V rozhovoru s Janou Bobošíkovou v pořadu JB Talk. konstatoval, že pořady 168 hodin nebo Reportéři ČT nejsou podle jeho názoru objektivní. Prozradil, čeho se bojí v souvislosti s migrací, a popsal, jak chápe liberalismus. Jako nárok na splnění všech tužeb člověka. A to podle něj není uskutečnitelné. Promluvil také o možné spolupráci s Václavem Klausem mladším.
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Zvědavec

Skládáme střípky informací

Nedržme už Babiše u vesla - začíná být pro nás nebezpečný

Maru 21.10.2019, 02:28

Ano, Chvilkařům a Kavárně navzdory držíme Babiše přes všechny jeho průšvihy u moci a bavíme se jejich běsněním. Ale Babiš teď již zachází opravdu příliš daleko. Pod jeho soft vedením směřujeme k budoucnosti islamizovaného zemského státu Německa.
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Dobrý člověk ještě žije!

Vladimír Stwora 19.10.2019, 02:59

Svého času běžela ve světě kampaň „udělej aspoň jeden dobrý skutek za den“. Kampaň provázel příběh o řidiči, který u vjezdu na placenou dálnici při placení mýtného řekl: „Platím za sebe a dalších 10 vozidel za mnou.“ Možná těch vozidel bylo 15, to už si nepamatuji, ale příběh se prý opravdu stal. Šlo o hec, udělat náhodně a nečekaně dobrý skutek. Jen tak.
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Vyvrácení smyšlenky, že Putin a Netanjahu/Izrael spolupracují

The Saker 18.10.2019, 04:34

Nebude to analýza ani komentář. Ani nesympatizuji s tureckou vojenskou operací v severní Sýrii, ani jí nevyjadřuji podporu. A nebudu mluvit ani o legitimitě (či jeho nedostatku) hnutí za kurdskou nezávislost. Jen chci upozornit na řadu faktů a logických imperativů, které dle mého názoru odhalují skutečnou podstatu a vyvracejí dezinformační kampaň, jež má za cíl přesvědčit nás o tom, že Putin a Netanjahu si hrají do ruky, nebo ještě lépe, že Putin je loutkou Izraelců. Takže mějte toto na paměti a jdeme na to:
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Ještě "hrajeme" kartu lidských práv nebo už se může říkat pravda?

David Dvořák 17.10.2019, 01:20

Katalánci v báni na 12 a více let, v demokratických volbách zvolení členové EU parlamentu se nemohli dostavit a složit slib, protože by skončili za katrem taktéž. Náš spojenec a člen obranného spolku NATO útočí a páchá válečné zločiny na území sousedního státu. Ještě že máme tu Jourovou ... na místě je: "zase se mi chce zvracet".
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Ukrajina koupila od České republiky várku samohybných houfnic Hvozdik

Autor neuveden 17.10.2019, 01:10

Ukrajina koupila od České republiky další várku samohybných houfnic 2S1 Hvozdik. Tentokrát bylo zakoupeno celkem 16 plnohodnotných vozidel a také jejich části včetně věží s instalovanými děly. Tímto způsobem se Ukrajina snaží vyřešit problém spojený s vysokými ztrátami dělostřelectva během války v Donbasu.
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Grilování Jourové

David Dvořák 16.10.2019, 01:20

Agentuře Wild Duck [WD] se podařilo zajistit a přeložit přímý zápis „grilování“ naší EU občanky Jourové před jmenováním do své nové funkce hlídače pravdy, spravedlnosti a lásky.
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Reakce na dnešní rozhodnutí Ústavného soudu o (ne)zdanění církevních restitucí

JUDr. Norbert Naxera 16.10.2019, 01:10

Mezi ty rovnější patří podle dnešního nálezu zejména církve. Ústavní soud se zastal církví, že zákon o zdanění církevních restitucí je protiústavní. Rozhodnutí jsem nečetl, myslím, že ani nebylo zatím zveřejněno, ale podle toho, co vyšlo v médiích, bylo hlavním důvodem, že zákon je retroaktivní, že církevní restituce byly schváleny v roce 2013 a zákon o zdanění až o pět let později a existuje právní zásada, že zákony nepůsobí zpětně. Avšak Ústavní soud „zapomněl“ na jeden důležitý faktor: že je dlouhodobě ustáleným zvykem, že v daňových zákonech zákaz retroaktivity neplatí.
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Joe Biden „osobně obdržel od firmy Burisma 900 000 dolarů“, přiznal ukrajinský poslanec

Tyler Durden 15.10.2019, 01:10

Ukrajinský poslanec Andrij Derkach ve středu prozradil, že bývalý viceprezident Joe Biden obdržel od firmy Burisma Group 900 000 dolarů za aktivity spojené s lobbováním, přičemž se odvolal na materiály, související s vyšetřováním.
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