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Que no decidan por nosotros | Bruno Rodríguez | TEDxRiodelaPlata

Náhled

Durante el último año se gestó una movilización global masiva para luchar contra la crisis climática y ecológica. Esta movilización está liderada por Greta Thunberg y jóvenes alrededor del mundo. Bruno Rodríguez es uno de ellos y en su ¨nanocharla¨ de solamente 2 minutos cuenta su decisión de que otros no decidan por él... ni por nosotros. Tiene 19 años, es egresado de ORT, estudiante de Ciencias Políticas y Derecho en la Universidad de Buenos Aires y un activista ambiental en Jóvenes por el Clima Argentina (@jovenesporelclimarg). También integra el grupo de jóvenes de Amnistía Internacional Argentina. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Why the spread of African swine fever is a human crisis I FT

Náhled
19.12.2019 23:58
Financial Times
spread African swine fever human crisis

Take our survey and tell us what you like about our YouTube channel and would like to see more of: https://bit.ly/33SJ8AI. The FT's Bangkok regional correspondent John Reed says the spread of the fever to southeast Asia is turning a Chinese food crisis into a global economic one. Read more at https://on.ft.com/38RwdSD ► Check out our Community tab for more stories on the economy. ► Listen to our podcasts: https://www.ft.com/podcasts ► Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/financialtimes Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Jóvenes con acceso al conocimiento pero sin el poder | Manuel Fernández Burda | TEDxRiodelaPlata

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Los jóvenes saben mucho sobre el mundo pero... no siempre pueden actuar usando ese conocimiento. Manuel Fernández Burda nos invita a escuchar a esa juventud e incorporar sus voces y opiniones en todo lo que decidimos. Manuel está en 4to. año del secundario y le encantan la química y la biología, tanto que participa en sus olimpíadas. Le fascinan la neurología, la cocina y, sobre todo, río y hacer reír a sus amigos. Viene del semillero de los clubes TED-Ed. Pero ojito, que es 1er. Dan de Taekowndo. Y sabe mover las orejas. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Execution May Set Dangerous Precedent Of Overruling Native Nations

Náhled

Watch Video When Attorney General William Barr reinstated federal executions in July, it ended a 16-year halt on capital punishment and forced the U.S. government to deal with several unanswered questions — one of which highlights America's long contentious relationship with Native American tribal sovereignty.Lezmond Mitchell is the  only Native American  on death row and could become the first Native person in modern American history to be executed by the U.S. government for killing another Native person on sovereign land. Mitchell, a member of the Navajo Nation, was convicted and sentenced to death for the 2001 murders of Alyce Slim and her nine-year-old granddaughter. Despite the conviction, the Navajo Nation, the federal prosecutor assigned to the case and multiple members of the Slim family recommended that Mitchell not be executed. The Navajo Nation's statement read: "By subjecting Mr. Mitchell to capital punishment, the Department of Justice has violated our laws and our belief system, … we view this action as both a moral and political affront to Navajo sovereignty."While the U.S. government has the power to prosecute  certain major crimes , like murder, on sovereign lands,  tribes can choose whether the crimes are elible for the death penalty . The Navajo Nation, along with the vast majority of American tribes, has opted out of federal executions. But John Ashcroft, the attorney general at the time, used a legal loophole to pursue the death penalty anyway. He sought execution because the murders took place  during a carjacking,  which falls under federal authority and does not feature an opt-in or out provision for Native people. The Navajo Nation believes 'traditional peacemaking' should be a legitimate part of the criminal justice system and said "the negative force that drives a person to commit evil acts can only be extracted by the Creator." Mitchell's attorney,  Jon Aminoff , told Newsy the federal government has largely respected the tribal nations' wishes on capital punishment until now. "There have been at least 20 other instances of murder on tribal land in which the DOJ has considered a capital prosecution, but ultimately declined to do so …  This decision violated the spirit, if not the letter, of the Federal Death Penalty Act."On Friday,  Aminoff argued Mitchell's appeal  in front of the Ninth Circuit. He claims there was racial bias in the jury that needs investigation because it did not appropriately represent Mitchell's Native peers, since there was only one Navajo on the jury. As it stands, Mitchell's appeal is the only thing standing between him and execution. Attorney General Barr scheduled five federal executions for the end of 2019 and early 2020. Four of the inmates set to be executed are wrapped up in a lawsuit against Attorney General Barr. Mitchell is not a part of that lawsuit, which means he's not protected by its injunction. According to the  Death Penalty Information Center , 2019 marks the first time in 25 years that a majority of Americans believe life in prison without parole is a better punishment for murder than the death penalty. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Execution May Set Dangerous Precedent Of Overruling Native Nations

Náhled

Watch Video When Attorney General William Barr reinstated federal executions in July, it ended a 16-year halt on capital punishment and forced the U.S. government to deal with several unanswered questions — one of which highlights America's long contentious relationship with Native American tribal sovereignty.Lezmond Mitchell is the  only Native American  on death row and could become the first Native person in modern American history to be executed by the U.S. government for killing another Native person on sovereign land. Mitchell, a member of the Navajo Nation, was convicted and sentenced to death for the 2001 murders of Alyce Slim and her nine-year-old granddaughter. Despite the conviction, the Navajo Nation, the federal prosecutor assigned to the case and multiple members of the Slim family recommended that Mitchell not be executed. The Navajo Nation's statement read: "By subjecting Mr. Mitchell to capital punishment, the Department of Justice has violated our laws and our belief system, … we view this action as both a moral and political affront to Navajo sovereignty."While the U.S. government has the power to prosecute  certain major crimes , like murder, on sovereign lands,  tribes can choose whether the crimes are elible for the death penalty . The Navajo Nation, along with the vast majority of American tribes, has opted out of federal executions. But John Ashcroft, the attorney general at the time, used a legal loophole to pursue the death penalty anyway. He sought execution because the murders took place  during a carjacking,  which falls under federal authority and does not feature an opt-in or out provision for Native people. The Navajo Nation believes 'traditional peacemaking' should be a legitimate part of the criminal justice system and said "the negative force that drives a person to commit evil acts can only be extracted by the Creator." Mitchell's attorney,  Jon Aminoff , told Newsy the federal government has largely respected the tribal nations' wishes on capital punishment until now. "There have been at least 20 other instances of murder on tribal land in which the DOJ has considered a capital prosecution, but ultimately declined to do so …  This decision violated the spirit, if not the letter, of the Federal Death Penalty Act."On Friday,  Aminoff argued Mitchell's appeal  in front of the Ninth Circuit. He claims there was racial bias in the jury that needs investigation because it did not appropriately represent Mitchell's Native peers, since there was only one Navajo on the jury. As it stands, Mitchell's appeal is the only thing standing between him and execution. Attorney General Barr scheduled five federal executions for the end of 2019 and early 2020. Four of the inmates set to be executed are wrapped up in a lawsuit against Attorney General Barr. Mitchell is not a part of that lawsuit, which means he's not protected by its injunction. According to the  Death Penalty Information Center , 2019 marks the first time in 25 years that a majority of Americans believe life in prison without parole is a better punishment for murder than the death penalty. Číst dále >>>

Why the spread of African swine fever is a human crisis I FT

Náhled
19.12.2019 22:58
Financial Times
spread African swine fever human crisis

The FT's Bangkok regional correspondent John Reed says the spread of the African swine fever to southeast Asia is turning a Chinese food crisis into a global economic one. Read more at https://on.ft.com/38RwdSD. ► Check out our Community tab for more stories on the economy. ► Listen to our podcasts: https://www.ft.com/podcasts ► Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/financialtimes Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

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