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Věda a technika - Hlavní události ve vědě - Hlavní události - 15. září 2015

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Liga mistrů odstartovala: Královcovy penalty, zlomení "Citizens"

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Prohlédněte si fotografie z prvních zápasů základních skupin úvodního kola fotbalové Ligy mistrů, jimiž začal další ročník milionářské soutěže. Číst dále >>>

California district agrees to pay $3.5B to clean up water

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The nation's largest irrigation district agreed to spend $3.5 billion to clean up contaminated water in California's fertile Central Valley in a tentative deal announced Tuesday that will settle a decades-old dispute with the federal government. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do cs

Hewlett-Packard sees up to 30,000 job losses in split

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Hewlett-Packard said Tuesday its upcoming corporate split will lead to job losses of 25,000 to 30,000. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do cs

Things to know about automatic license plate readers

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Authorities chasing the suspect in a fatal shooting at Delta State University in Mississippi used an automatic license plate reader to track the man as he traveled across state lines. The technology was also used in Virginia weeks ago when a disgruntled former television reporter fatally shot two former colleagues during a live interview. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do cs

Mission Day 14: Mad Respect, AKA Don't Kill Bob

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This post should really be titled, "MAD, MAD, MAD" respect. Respect for what, you may ask? For lifelong astronauts? For scientists and support staff who spent winter in Antarctica? For service people aboard submarines and ships who do this isolation thing all the time? Absolutely, but I've respected the heck out of those folks for years. This is brand new respect we're talking about here. Over the last two weeks -- two weeks already! -- I've come upon a profound pile of respect, basically a mountain of respect, for people who feed families of six or more in underdeveloped countries. It's an all-day long, and half-the-night long endeavor. I don't know how anyone does it for weeks, months, years on end. I am not kidding in the slightest. I had absolutely no idea what it took to keep a group of this size fed and watered by hand until I was thrown on top of a volcano with five other people who like to eat bread, drink milk, and dirty dishes all day long. How did I miss this? In high school, I lived in a dorm with 12 other people, including two 18-year-old Japanese football players who individually -- not collectively -- consumed a lasagna, a loaf of garlic bread, and a green salad the size of a six-month-old baby for dinner every day. In college, I lived in a co-op with 40 other similarly talented consumers of food and makers of domestic chaos. Berkeley + lots of pillows + movie night + popcorn = a mess of epic proportions. Kernels continued to be found in every nook and cranny for weeks afterward (especially when the movie is Real Genius. I should have known better). In graduate school, I had a minimum of three roommates at all times, most of whom were European (99 percent bread, wine, and products derived from olives by volume). Then it becomes obvious how I missed this. In grad school, I used to make a couple of loaves every week... in a bread machine. Here, I am making a loaf of bread a day, by hand. That is, after I or another crew member, makes a liter of milk (long live Nido). Then, there's the several rounds of yogurt culturing daily. Don't get me start on the cheese. This crew likes their cheese (we may be 99 percent cheese by volume). 2015-09-13-1442133843-1574435-baking300x225.jpg Rationally speaking, I know that a group of six scientists ranging in age from their mid-twenties to their mid-thirties can't possibly be eating as much as my roommates in high school and college. The difference here is that everything you want to put in your mouth, you have to make it first. That's where the mad respect comes in. There's no running to the corner bodega around here. If you want milk, you reach into the pantry for the powdered whole, you head to the kitchen island for a measuring cup, and you set to work. Once you have your milk nice and liquefied, you can think about making some bread. That's assuming that you have a bread culture going, happy and bubbling away in a corner somewhere. Fortunately, we started ours shortly after the hatch closed. Our starter is a sourdough -- milder than the San Francisco variety, a bit sweeter, and slightly more versatile. Also, after being fed and watered every day for two weeks, it is fuerte. The starter -- let's call it Bob for short -- began as a single packet the size of your thumb. Today, if you give it water, flour, and something sweet to chew on (we use honey), Bob can grow into a puffy loaf the size of a football within an hour. Someone still has to feed and water Bob -- wake him up and get him moving in the morning. I've been making bread since college, so I didn't think twice about doing it. Now that I've been baking loaves of bread by hand for two weeks... 2015-09-13-1442133869-6369350-bread.jpg ... RESPECT -- mad, mad, mad respect -- for the people who do this every single day of their lives. And also, for the food itself. Take yogurt as an example. A lot of us enjoy yogurt. Many of us are aware that under that cool white exterior, the creamy yogurt experience is powered by some very active little bugs. Our batch of yogurt bacteria are called Filmjolk. For ease, let's call our yogurt culture Haans. When you nudge Haans from his slumber, feed him reconstituted whole milk and leave him somewhere nice and warm, in about eight hours he hands you back a soft, vaguely sweet, mildly sour substan Číst dále >>> Přeložit do cs

Mission Day 14: Mad Respect, AKA Don't Kill Bob

Náhled

This post should really be titled, "MAD, MAD, MAD" respect. Respect for what, you may ask? For lifelong astronauts? For scientists and support staff who spent winter in Antarctica? For service people aboard submarines and ships who do this isolation thing all the time? Absolutely, but I've respected the heck out of those folks for years. This is brand new respect we're talking about here. Over the last two weeks -- two weeks already! -- I've come upon a profound pile of respect, basically a mountain of respect, for people who feed families of six or more in underdeveloped countries. It's an all-day long, and half-the-night long endeavor. I don't know how anyone does it for weeks, months, years on end. I am not kidding in the slightest. I had absolutely no idea what it took to keep a group of this size fed and watered by hand until I was thrown on top of a volcano with five other people who like to eat bread, drink milk, and dirty dishes all day long. How did I miss this? In high school, I lived in a dorm with 12 other people, including two 18-year-old Japanese football players who individually -- not collectively -- consumed a lasagna, a loaf of garlic bread, and a green salad the size of a six-month-old baby for dinner every day. In college, I lived in a co-op with 40 other similarly talented consumers of food and makers of domestic chaos. Berkeley + lots of pillows + movie night + popcorn = a mess of epic proportions. Kernels continued to be found in every nook and cranny for weeks afterward (especially when the movie is Real Genius. I should have known better). In graduate school, I had a minimum of three roommates at all times, most of whom were European (99 percent bread, wine, and products derived from olives by volume). Then it becomes obvious how I missed this. In grad school, I used to make a couple of loaves every week... in a bread machine. Here, I am making a loaf of bread a day, by hand. That is, after I or another crew member, makes a liter of milk (long live Nido). Then, there's the several rounds of yogurt culturing daily. Don't get me start on the cheese. This crew likes their cheese (we may be 99 percent cheese by volume). 2015-09-13-1442133843-1574435-baking300x225.jpg Rationally speaking, I know that a group of six scientists ranging in age from their mid-twenties to their mid-thirties can't possibly be eating as much as my roommates in high school and college. The difference here is that everything you want to put in your mouth, you have to make it first. That's where the mad respect comes in. There's no running to the corner bodega around here. If you want milk, you reach into the pantry for the powdered whole, you head to the kitchen island for a measuring cup, and you set to work. Once you have your milk nice and liquefied, you can think about making some bread. That's assuming that you have a bread culture going, happy and bubbling away in a corner somewhere. Fortunately, we started ours shortly after the hatch closed. Our starter is a sourdough -- milder than the San Francisco variety, a bit sweeter, and slightly more versatile. Also, after being fed and watered every day for two weeks, it is fuerte. The starter -- let's call it Bob for short -- began as a single packet the size of your thumb. Today, if you give it water, flour, and something sweet to chew on (we use honey), Bob can grow into a puffy loaf the size of a football within an hour. Someone still has to feed and water Bob -- wake him up and get him moving in the morning. I've been making bread since college, so I didn't think twice about doing it. Now that I've been baking loaves of bread by hand for two weeks... 2015-09-13-1442133869-6369350-bread.jpg ... RESPECT -- mad, mad, mad respect -- for the people who do this every single day of their lives. And also, for the food itself. Take yogurt as an example. A lot of us enjoy yogurt. Many of us are aware that under that cool white exterior, the creamy yogurt experience is powered by some very active little bugs. Our batch of yogurt bacteria are called Filmjolk. For ease, let's call our yogurt culture Haans. When you nudge Haans from his slumber, feed him reconstituted whole milk and leave him somewhere nice and warm, in about eight hours he hands you back a soft, vaguely sweet, mildly sour subs Číst dále >>> Přeložit do cs

New method could help nurses spot delirium quickly

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Asking just two questions may be able to help nurses and doctors quickly and easily identify delirium in hospitalized older adults, according to health researchers. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do cs

Solar Observatory discovers its 3,000th comet

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media thumbnail On Sept. 13, 2015, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory—a joint project of the European Space Agency and NASA—discovered its 3,000th comet, cementing its standing as the greatest comet finder of all time. Prior to the 1995 launch of the observatory, commonly known as SOHO, only a dozen or so comets had ever even been discovered from space, while some 900 had been discovered from the ground. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do cs

Scientists Fear Sex Robots Could Be Bad For Society

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We’ve joked about robots being the future of sex , but for these two researchers, it's no laughing matter. Kathleen Richardson and Erik Billing on Tuesday launched the Campaign Against Sex Robots , an effort to draw attention to what they see as the potential societal harm of human-like robots created for the purpose of having sex with humans. While these products are not yet widely available, they “seem to be a  growing focus  in the robotics industry,” Richardson, an ethics of robotics research fellow at England’s De Montfort University, told the BBC. Billing, a lecturer at the University of Skovde in Sweden, told The Huffington Post in an email that he and Richardson "did not launch this campaign to protect the rights of the robots." Instead, he explained, they are concerned that using sex robots could foster unhealthy attitudes towards sex and gender relations. "The danger of sex robots lies in what we read into them, how we form fantasies that, in some respects, become a reality -- a reality where the human (male) user is expected to turn on his woman robot companion for his own, lone, pleasure," Billing said. "I think most of us would agree that this is very far from a healthy, mutual, sexual relationship." The campaign's website  features a position paper by Richardson  comparing the relationship between a person and a sex robot to that between a client and a human sex worker. Richardson argues that the proliferation of sex robots would strengthen the attitudes of objectification and exploitation that she says are prevalent in the commercial sex trade.  Even though the campaigners argue that there are strong parallels between robot sex and commercial human sex, they reject previous arguments  that robots might simply replace human sex workers. Rather, Billing and Richardson say such technology would just "reinforce" the sex trade, "creating more demand for human bodies." But how similar is sex with robots to commercial sex with humans? Robots are literal objects, while sex workers are human beings with thoughts, feelings and agency. And while Richardson and Billing maintain that a person who pays for sex views the seller as a “thing” -- like a robot -- other research suggests the phenomenon is more complex. “Men buy sex because they want more sex, different types of sex, different types of women (and men), because of opportunity, loneliness, lack of a relationship,”  sociologist Teela Sanders wrote in 2007.  “Yet the sex industry is not always a place of fleeting, emotionless sexual liaisons ... men who regularly visit the same sex workers speak of their relationships in terms of intimacy and companionship.” And whatever the implications for the commercial sex trade, some argue that the Campaign Against Sex Robots could stifle valuable research. The campaign's site states that one of its goals is "to encourage computer scientists and roboticists to refuse to contribute to the development of sex robots as a field by refusing to provide code, hardware or ideas."  Computer researcher Kate Devlin calls that goal "shortsighted." “Instead of calling for an outright ban, why not use the topic as a base from which to explore new ideas of inclusivity, legality and social change?" Delvin asked  Tuesday. "Fear of a branch of [artificial intelligence] that is in its infancy is a reason to shape it -- not to ban it. Yes, there is a place for ethics in robotics. And, like sex between humans, talking about it can make it better." But Billing defended himself against that criticism, saying fostering a dialogue is exactly what he and Richardson intend to do. "We are not against research on sex robots," he said. "However, we are strongly against the development of sex robots without a consideration of the ethical and social consequences of such machines." Contact the author of this article at Hilary.Hanson Číst dále >>> Přeložit do cs

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