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Zpravodajství - Životní styl - - 11. listopadu 2019

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UPDATE 1-Three performers stabbed at Saudi entertainment event -state TV

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UPDATE 1-Three performers stabbed at Saudi entertainment event -state TV A man stabbed three performers at a live show in Saudi Arabia’s capital and was arrested, state television reported on Monday, adding that the victims were in stable condition. The incident occurred at King Abdullah Park in central Riyadh, one of several venues hosting a two-month long entertainment festival as part of government efforts to open up Saudi society and diversify its economy away from oil. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has eased social restrictions and promoted entertainment previously banned in the conservative Muslim kingdom, risking a backlash from religious critics. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

UPDATE 1-Three performers stabbed at Saudi entertainment event -state TV

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UPDATE 1-Three performers stabbed at Saudi entertainment event -state TV A man stabbed three performers at a live show in Saudi Arabia’s capital and was arrested, state television reported on Monday, adding that the victims were in stable condition. The incident occurred at King Abdullah Park in central Riyadh, one of several venues hosting a two-month long entertainment festival as part of government efforts to open up Saudi society and diversify its economy away from oil. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has eased social restrictions and promoted entertainment previously banned in the conservative Muslim kingdom, risking a backlash from religious critics. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Michaels is having a big Christmas tree sale — save up to 60% on all artificial trees

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michaelstree

  • Michaels is currently running its annual " Tremendous Tree Event ," where Christmas trees are on sale for up to 60% off. Many bestsellers that are typically well over $100, are now below $40 .
  • You'll also get free shipping on any tree that costs $49 or more.
  • Michaels makes the tree-shopping process easy. You can search by size, shape, lights, color, and price.
  'Tis the season for holiday sales — and not just the ones on Christmas gifts . Right now, Michaels is running its annual " Tremendous Tree Event ," which means you can save up to 60% on faux Christmas trees. The brand is also having a sale on festive decor , most of which is currently 50% off.  As part of the sale, many bestselling Christmas trees that are normally over $100 are now under $40 . Plus, trees that are $49 and up will ship for free, making this sale especially timely for anyone who wants to avoid a trip to the store or tree farm. You can shop by tree size, shape, lights, color, and price. And since most Michaels trees are backed by limited warranties, you won't have to worry about replacing your tree any time soon. Shop Michaels Christmas tree sale See more useful Christmas gift and decor guides: Join the conversation about this story » Číst dále >>>

Canadian hockey commentator Don Cherry fired over inflammatory remarks toward immigrants

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Canadian hockey commentator Don Cherry fired over inflammatory remarks toward immigrants Don Cherry, whose provocative views and outlandish suit jackets made for appointment viewing on Canada's popular Saturday night hockey broadcasts, was fired after inflammatory comments he directed at Canadian immigrants, the Sportsnet network said on Monday. Cherry attracted adulation and criticism for his outspoken views on the state of hockey and its players. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Is It a Crime to Encourage Illegal Immigration? The Supreme Court Will Decide

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Is It a Crime to Encourage Illegal Immigration? The Supreme Court Will Decide WASHINGTON -- A 1986 federal law makes it a crime to "encourage" immigrants without authorization to come to or stay in the United States."The statute potentially criminalizes the simple words -- spoken to a son, a wife, a parent, a friend, a neighbor, a co-worker, a student, a client -- 'I encourage you to stay here,'" Judge A. Wallace Tashima wrote last year for a unanimous panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in San Francisco, in striking down the law.The law applies to a grandmother urging a grandchild to overstay a visa or a lawyer advising a client to stay in the country while fighting deportation, Tashima wrote. It may cover public officials helping immigrants in sanctuary cities and perhaps even speeches at immigration rallies, he wrote.Last month, the Supreme Court agreed to decide whether the law can be squared with the First Amendment. The case, United States v. Sineneng-Smith, No. 19-67, is one of several significant immigration matters on the court's docket. On Tuesday, the court will hear arguments on whether the Trump administration can rescind protections for so-called Dreamers. Later in the term, it will consider whether immigrants can go to court to challenge orders calling for their expedited removal.The First Amendment case concerns Evelyn Sineneng-Smith, who ran an immigration consulting firm in San Jose, California. Her clients, mostly from the Philippines, worked without authorization in the home health care industry. Sineneng-Smith offered to help them get green cards under a Labor Department certification program that she said would give them permanent resident status and allow them to work legally.But the program had expired. Sineneng-Smith nonetheless charged her clients $6,800 to file applications she knew to be futile. She was convicted of mail fraud, a conviction that the 9th Circuit affirmed and that Sineneng-Smith is not challenging in the Supreme Court. The question for the justices is whether her separate conviction under the 1986 law for encouraging her clients to stay in the United States was proper.In the 9th Circuit, Sineneng-Smith argued that she had a First Amendment right to file the applications, which was not a particularly strong argument. "Speech integral to criminal conduct," the Supreme Court has said, is not protected by the First Amendment.When the case reached the 9th Circuit, it did something unusual. It asked for briefing on a different First Amendment question. The court wanted to know whether the law was overbroad, chilling the free speech of people other than Sineneng-Smith.After getting additional briefs and hearing another round of arguments, the appeals court ruled that the law was unconstitutional.In urging the Supreme Court to hear its appeal, the Trump administration said the 9th Circuit had gone too far. The Supreme Court has said that striking down laws because they are too broad is "strong medicine" to be used only when the laws are unconstitutional in a substantial number of real-world settings rather than in "fanciful hypotheticals."In his 9th Circuit opinion, Tashima said that his examples of possible prosecutions "are not some parade of fanciful horribles.""Instead," he wrote, "they represent real and constitutionally protected conversations and advice that happen daily."Whatever the literal language of the 1986 law, Solicitor General Noel J. Francisco wrote for the government in its petition seeking review, criminal laws are "ordinarily understood not to prohibit abstract advocacy of illegality.""Just as a teenager does not aid, abet or solicit marijuana possession merely by saying to a friend, 'I encourage you to try smoking pot,'" Francisco wrote, a grandmother does not violate the 1986 law "merely by saying to her grandson whose visa has expired, 'I encourage you to stay.'"Francisco asked the justices to decide only whether speech made for financial gain could be made criminal. The 1986 law does discuss financial gain, but in a separate provision allowing longer sentences when money is involved.Prosecutions under the law tend to be limited to cases concerning classically criminal conduct by unsympathetic defendants. But not always. In 2012, for instance, a Massachusetts woman, Lorraine Henderson, was convicted of hiring an immigrant in the country illegally to clean her home and offering general and not always reliable advice about immigration law.In that case, Judge Douglas P. Woodlock, of the U.S. District Court in B Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Is It a Crime to Encourage Illegal Immigration? The Supreme Court Will Decide

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Is It a Crime to Encourage Illegal Immigration? The Supreme Court Will Decide WASHINGTON -- A 1986 federal law makes it a crime to "encourage" immigrants without authorization to come to or stay in the United States."The statute potentially criminalizes the simple words -- spoken to a son, a wife, a parent, a friend, a neighbor, a co-worker, a student, a client -- 'I encourage you to stay here,'" Judge A. Wallace Tashima wrote last year for a unanimous panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in San Francisco, in striking down the law.The law applies to a grandmother urging a grandchild to overstay a visa or a lawyer advising a client to stay in the country while fighting deportation, Tashima wrote. It may cover public officials helping immigrants in sanctuary cities and perhaps even speeches at immigration rallies, he wrote.Last month, the Supreme Court agreed to decide whether the law can be squared with the First Amendment. The case, United States v. Sineneng-Smith, No. 19-67, is one of several significant immigration matters on the court's docket. On Tuesday, the court will hear arguments on whether the Trump administration can rescind protections for so-called Dreamers. Later in the term, it will consider whether immigrants can go to court to challenge orders calling for their expedited removal.The First Amendment case concerns Evelyn Sineneng-Smith, who ran an immigration consulting firm in San Jose, California. Her clients, mostly from the Philippines, worked without authorization in the home health care industry. Sineneng-Smith offered to help them get green cards under a Labor Department certification program that she said would give them permanent resident status and allow them to work legally.But the program had expired. Sineneng-Smith nonetheless charged her clients $6,800 to file applications she knew to be futile. She was convicted of mail fraud, a conviction that the 9th Circuit affirmed and that Sineneng-Smith is not challenging in the Supreme Court. The question for the justices is whether her separate conviction under the 1986 law for encouraging her clients to stay in the United States was proper.In the 9th Circuit, Sineneng-Smith argued that she had a First Amendment right to file the applications, which was not a particularly strong argument. "Speech integral to criminal conduct," the Supreme Court has said, is not protected by the First Amendment.When the case reached the 9th Circuit, it did something unusual. It asked for briefing on a different First Amendment question. The court wanted to know whether the law was overbroad, chilling the free speech of people other than Sineneng-Smith.After getting additional briefs and hearing another round of arguments, the appeals court ruled that the law was unconstitutional.In urging the Supreme Court to hear its appeal, the Trump administration said the 9th Circuit had gone too far. The Supreme Court has said that striking down laws because they are too broad is "strong medicine" to be used only when the laws are unconstitutional in a substantial number of real-world settings rather than in "fanciful hypotheticals."In his 9th Circuit opinion, Tashima said that his examples of possible prosecutions "are not some parade of fanciful horribles.""Instead," he wrote, "they represent real and constitutionally protected conversations and advice that happen daily."Whatever the literal language of the 1986 law, Solicitor General Noel J. Francisco wrote for the government in its petition seeking review, criminal laws are "ordinarily understood not to prohibit abstract advocacy of illegality.""Just as a teenager does not aid, abet or solicit marijuana possession merely by saying to a friend, 'I encourage you to try smoking pot,'" Francisco wrote, a grandmother does not violate the 1986 law "merely by saying to her grandson whose visa has expired, 'I encourage you to stay.'"Francisco asked the justices to decide only whether speech made for financial gain could be made criminal. The 1986 law does discuss financial gain, but in a separate provision allowing longer sentences when money is involved.Prosecutions under the law tend to be limited to cases concerning classically criminal conduct by unsympathetic defendants. But not always. In 2012, for instance, a Massachusetts woman, Lorraine Henderson, was convicted of hiring an immigrant in the country illegally to clean her home and offering general and not always reliable advice about immigration law.In that case, Judge Douglas P. Woodlock, of the U.S. District Court in B Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Pentagon chief says Vindman should not fear Army retaliation

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Pentagon chief says Vindman should not fear Army retaliation Defense Secretary Mark Esper said Monday that an Army officer has no reason to fear retribution for testifying before Congress in the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. Esper was asked about potential retribution for Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman during a trip to New York City. The defense secretary said the Pentagon "has protections for whistleblowers" who report waste, fraud or abuse. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Athena Jezik Massage Tutorial for Pregnant Women, Back, Neck & Scalp, Prenatal, Side Lying Technique

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Athena teaches Side Lying techniques for massaging pregnant women or anyone who is uncomfortable lying on their stomache. ♥ See Athena's full collection of videos: http://serene.team ♥ Exclusive Massage for our Loyal Patrons: http://www.psychetruthpatrons.com Athena's soft-spoken voice may have ASMR effects. Athena Jezik specializes in Lymphatic Drainage and Cranio-Sacral Therapy in Austin, Texas. http://www.athenajezik.com Follow our Social Media https://www.instagram.com/psychetruth http://www.facebook.com/psychetruthvideos http://www.pinterest.com/psychetruth Related Massage Therapy Videos Fit Back Massage Therapy With Athena Jezik & Dena Maddie How To Massage Muscular Back https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMjDQ5KC1z8&list=PLFE634ED27CAF1591 Athena Jezik Massage: Pure Relaxation Technique, Relaxing Back Tutorial, ASMR Soft Spoken https://youtu.be/lW4uKSJloAM Athena Jezik Back Massage for Sleep & Relaxation, Soft Spoken Tutorial, How to, Techniques for Pain https://youtu.be/DoJfifzrs2M HD Back Massage Relaxation Techniques - ASMR Athena Jezik Full Body Series 1 of 7 60P https://youtu.be/BdL_aocA0FA Athena Jezik: How the Lymphatic System Works, Health, Detox, Healing, How to https://youtu.be/s6CM2vAX7AA Music By iChill Music Factory Song: Magic of Reiki Album: Reiki http://www.ichillmusic.com © Copyright 2019 Target Public Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. #WellnessPlus #AthenaJezik #Massage #Psychetruth #Athenamassage #Relax #relaxingmassage #prenatalmassage #pregnancy #backmassage Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Days after being fined for misusing veterans' funds, Trump urges people to celebrate Veterans' Day by donating to his campaign

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Days after being fined for misusing veterans' funds, Trump urges people to celebrate Veterans' Day by donating to his campaign If you can't thank a veteran today, do the next best thing and donate to a non-veteran!President Trump's campaign fundraising team didn't miss a beat this Veterans Day, running a Facebook ad on Monday encouraging people to say "THANK YOU, VETERANS" by donating to the president's metaphorical war chest.Trump, who is not a veteran, famously deferred the Vietnam War draft several times.> New Trump Facebook ad encourages people to say "THANK YOU VETERANS" by donating to... the Trump campaign pic.twitter.com/qCsFz882wE> > -- Judd Legum (@JuddLegum) November 11, 2019The ad, which includes a can't-miss 25 percent off coupon, provoked criticism of the president, with veteran Mark Hertling pointing out the somewhat bizarre timing of the Trump campaign's message. A judge ordered Trump to pay $2 million last week over his alleged mishandling of funds for veterans, which were instead used for political purposes, CBS News reports.> Bold move. As a veteran, is it okay to be offended by this effort + the fact the date of Veterans Day is wrong + this occurs just a few days after his charity was penalized $2M for bilking veterans? https://t.co/iT69DmRozR> > -- Mark Hertling (@MarkHertling) November 11, 2019The president also celebrated the day by attending New York City's Veterans Day parade, where he took the time to honor Gold Star families, despite his history of feuding with several of them.Although if Trump really is burying the hatchet this Veterans Day, he should be sure to get the date right in next year's Facebook ad.More stories from theweek.com The coming death of just about every rock legend The president has already confessed to his crimes Why are 2020 Democrats so weird? Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

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