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Why the spread of African swine fever is a human crisis I FT

Náhled
19.12.2019 23:58
Financial Times
spread African swine fever human crisis

Take our survey and tell us what you like about our YouTube channel and would like to see more of: https://bit.ly/33SJ8AI. The FT's Bangkok regional correspondent John Reed says the spread of the fever to southeast Asia is turning a Chinese food crisis into a global economic one. Read more at https://on.ft.com/38RwdSD ► Check out our Community tab for more stories on the economy. ► Listen to our podcasts: https://www.ft.com/podcasts ► Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/financialtimes Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Execution May Set Dangerous Precedent Of Overruling Native Nations

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Watch Video When Attorney General William Barr reinstated federal executions in July, it ended a 16-year halt on capital punishment and forced the U.S. government to deal with several unanswered questions — one of which highlights America's long contentious relationship with Native American tribal sovereignty.Lezmond Mitchell is the  only Native American  on death row and could become the first Native person in modern American history to be executed by the U.S. government for killing another Native person on sovereign land. Mitchell, a member of the Navajo Nation, was convicted and sentenced to death for the 2001 murders of Alyce Slim and her nine-year-old granddaughter. Despite the conviction, the Navajo Nation, the federal prosecutor assigned to the case and multiple members of the Slim family recommended that Mitchell not be executed. The Navajo Nation's statement read: "By subjecting Mr. Mitchell to capital punishment, the Department of Justice has violated our laws and our belief system, … we view this action as both a moral and political affront to Navajo sovereignty."While the U.S. government has the power to prosecute  certain major crimes , like murder, on sovereign lands,  tribes can choose whether the crimes are elible for the death penalty . The Navajo Nation, along with the vast majority of American tribes, has opted out of federal executions. But John Ashcroft, the attorney general at the time, used a legal loophole to pursue the death penalty anyway. He sought execution because the murders took place  during a carjacking,  which falls under federal authority and does not feature an opt-in or out provision for Native people. The Navajo Nation believes 'traditional peacemaking' should be a legitimate part of the criminal justice system and said "the negative force that drives a person to commit evil acts can only be extracted by the Creator." Mitchell's attorney,  Jon Aminoff , told Newsy the federal government has largely respected the tribal nations' wishes on capital punishment until now. "There have been at least 20 other instances of murder on tribal land in which the DOJ has considered a capital prosecution, but ultimately declined to do so …  This decision violated the spirit, if not the letter, of the Federal Death Penalty Act."On Friday,  Aminoff argued Mitchell's appeal  in front of the Ninth Circuit. He claims there was racial bias in the jury that needs investigation because it did not appropriately represent Mitchell's Native peers, since there was only one Navajo on the jury. As it stands, Mitchell's appeal is the only thing standing between him and execution. Attorney General Barr scheduled five federal executions for the end of 2019 and early 2020. Four of the inmates set to be executed are wrapped up in a lawsuit against Attorney General Barr. Mitchell is not a part of that lawsuit, which means he's not protected by its injunction. According to the  Death Penalty Information Center , 2019 marks the first time in 25 years that a majority of Americans believe life in prison without parole is a better punishment for murder than the death penalty. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Execution May Set Dangerous Precedent Of Overruling Native Nations

Náhled

Watch Video When Attorney General William Barr reinstated federal executions in July, it ended a 16-year halt on capital punishment and forced the U.S. government to deal with several unanswered questions — one of which highlights America's long contentious relationship with Native American tribal sovereignty.Lezmond Mitchell is the  only Native American  on death row and could become the first Native person in modern American history to be executed by the U.S. government for killing another Native person on sovereign land. Mitchell, a member of the Navajo Nation, was convicted and sentenced to death for the 2001 murders of Alyce Slim and her nine-year-old granddaughter. Despite the conviction, the Navajo Nation, the federal prosecutor assigned to the case and multiple members of the Slim family recommended that Mitchell not be executed. The Navajo Nation's statement read: "By subjecting Mr. Mitchell to capital punishment, the Department of Justice has violated our laws and our belief system, … we view this action as both a moral and political affront to Navajo sovereignty."While the U.S. government has the power to prosecute  certain major crimes , like murder, on sovereign lands,  tribes can choose whether the crimes are elible for the death penalty . The Navajo Nation, along with the vast majority of American tribes, has opted out of federal executions. But John Ashcroft, the attorney general at the time, used a legal loophole to pursue the death penalty anyway. He sought execution because the murders took place  during a carjacking,  which falls under federal authority and does not feature an opt-in or out provision for Native people. The Navajo Nation believes 'traditional peacemaking' should be a legitimate part of the criminal justice system and said "the negative force that drives a person to commit evil acts can only be extracted by the Creator." Mitchell's attorney,  Jon Aminoff , told Newsy the federal government has largely respected the tribal nations' wishes on capital punishment until now. "There have been at least 20 other instances of murder on tribal land in which the DOJ has considered a capital prosecution, but ultimately declined to do so …  This decision violated the spirit, if not the letter, of the Federal Death Penalty Act."On Friday,  Aminoff argued Mitchell's appeal  in front of the Ninth Circuit. He claims there was racial bias in the jury that needs investigation because it did not appropriately represent Mitchell's Native peers, since there was only one Navajo on the jury. As it stands, Mitchell's appeal is the only thing standing between him and execution. Attorney General Barr scheduled five federal executions for the end of 2019 and early 2020. Four of the inmates set to be executed are wrapped up in a lawsuit against Attorney General Barr. Mitchell is not a part of that lawsuit, which means he's not protected by its injunction. According to the  Death Penalty Information Center , 2019 marks the first time in 25 years that a majority of Americans believe life in prison without parole is a better punishment for murder than the death penalty. Číst dále >>>

¡Alarmante!: Más de 3600 casos de abuso sexual infantil en nuestro país en lo que va del año

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media thumbnail Alrededor de 13 niños al día denuncian haber sido abusados sexualmente. Esta alarmante cifra es lo que motivó a un grupo de padres a formar "Por nuestros niños" cuyo objetivo es prevenir este delito. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Trump Lawyers Ask If Pelosi Delay Means He Isn’t Impeached Yet

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Trump Lawyers Ask If Pelosi Delay Means He Isn’t Impeached Yet (Bloomberg) -- Lawyers close to President Donald Trump are exploring whether House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s decision to temporarily withhold articles of impeachment from the Senate could mean that the president hasn’t actually been impeached.The case is a rhetorical one following Wednesday night’s vote to impeach the president on two articles. The U.S. Constitution grants the House of Representatives full authority over impeachment. But the argument is part of an effort by the White House and Senate Republicans to maximize their leverage as lawmakers debate when and how to conduct a trial on charges that the president abused his power to solicit an investigation into political rival Joe Biden, and obstructed the congressional investigation into the matter.The White House legal theory, according to a person familiar with the legal review, is that if Trump has been officially impeached, the Senate should already have jurisdiction. Backers of the theory would argue that the clause of the U.S. Constitution that gives the Senate “the sole Power to try all Impeachments” indicates that the impeachment isn’t formalized until the House reported the charges to the upper chamber.Speaking Thursday in the Oval Office, Trump said it was “unconstitutional” for Pelosi to not to submit the articles of impeachment to the Senate.“To me, it doesn’t feel like impeachment,” Trump added.The Constitution doesn’t specify how quickly the articles must be sent to the Senate, according to a Bloomberg Opinion column by Noah Feldman, a law professor at Harvard University. “An indefinite delay would pose a serious problem,” he wrote.“The House must actually send the articles and send managers to the Senate to prosecute the impeachment,” he said in the column. “And the Senate must actually hold a trial.”Laurence Tribe, a constitutional law professor at Harvard, tweeted that Senate rules requiring the House to immediately present articles of impeachment would also be unconstitutional.“It’s up to the House when and how to prosecute its case in the Senate,” Tribe said.Pelosi suggested Wednesday night that she might wait to appoint “managers” who present the case for the president’s removal to the Senate until Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, a Kentucky Republican, commits to rules that would ensure a “fair” trial.The gambit, which was advocated by liberals within Pelosi’s caucus, appears to be an attempt to pressure McConnell to call current and former White House officials who declined to participate in the House investigation to testify. Senate Republicans have indicated their preference is for a short trial, without witnesses, followed by a quick vote to acquit the president.Trump on Thursday said the maneuver was evidence Pelosi was “afraid” to present the impeachment to the Republican-controlled Senate, where he is expected to be acquitted.And Josh Holmes, a former chief of staff to McConnell, called Pelosi’s decision a gift to Republicans.Pelosi said on Thursday that she didn’t “care what Republicans say” and wasn’t prepared to name impeachment managers “because we don’t know the arena that we are in.” She pointed out that under House rules adopted for consideration of the impeachment articles, she could call up a resolution naming those people at any time, with no expiration.(Updates with law professor’s column starting in sixth paragraph.)To contact the reporters on this story: Jennifer Jacobs in Washington at jjacobs68@bloomberg.net;Justin Sink in Washington at jsink1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Alex Wayne at awayne3@bloomberg.net, John Harney, Joshua GalluFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Украинского спортсмена обязали вернуть олимпийское золото из-за допинга "Ukrainskogo sportsmena objazali vernut olimpijjskoe zoloto iz-za dopinga"

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enclosure image 18 декабря Торохтий был дисквалифицирован на два года за применение дегидрохлорметилтестостерона. Международный олимпийский комитет (МОК) обязал украинского штангиста Алексея Торохтия вернуть золотую медаль Игр 2012 года после того, как спортсмена дисквалифицировали за нарушение антидопинговых правил. Читать далее... Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Evo kakvo nas vrijeme sutra očekuje

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Danas je našoj zemlji bilo pretežno oblačno vrijeme. U večernjim satima kiša se očekuje u Hercegovini i na jugozapadu Bosne. Temperature zraka u 13 sati (°C): Bjelašnica 2; Zenica 8; Sanski Most 9; Tuzla 10; Ivan Sedlo 11; Gradačac, Sarajevo 12; Livno 13; Grude, Mostar, Široki Brijeg 14; Bihać, Bugojno, Drvar 15; Stolac 16; Neum 18; Sutra se u jutarnjim sautf8 Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Why the spread of African swine fever is a human crisis I FT

Náhled
19.12.2019 22:58
Financial Times
spread African swine fever human crisis

The FT's Bangkok regional correspondent John Reed says the spread of the African swine fever to southeast Asia is turning a Chinese food crisis into a global economic one. Read more at https://on.ft.com/38RwdSD. ► Check out our Community tab for more stories on the economy. ► Listen to our podcasts: https://www.ft.com/podcasts ► Follow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/financialtimes Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

Execution May Set Dangerous Precedent Of Overruling Native Nations

Náhled

Watch Video When Attorney General William Barr reinstated federal executions in July, it ended a 16-year halt on capital punishment and forced the U.S. government to deal with several unanswered questions — one of which highlights America's long contentious relationship with Native American tribal sovereignty.Lezmond Mitchell is the  only Native American  on death row and could become the first Native person in modern American history to be executed by the U.S. government for killing another Native person on sovereign land. Mitchell, a member of the Navajo Nation, was convicted and sentenced to death for the 2001 murders of Alyce Slim and her nine-year-old granddaughter. Despite the conviction, the Navajo Nation, the federal prosecutor assigned to the case and multiple members of the Slim family recommended that Mitchell not be executed. The Navajo Nation's statement read: "By subjecting Mr. Mitchell to capital punishment, the Department of Justice has violated our laws and our belief system, … we view this action as both a moral and political affront to Navajo sovereignty."While the U.S. government has the power to prosecute  certain major crimes , like murder, on sovereign lands,  tribes can choose whether the crimes are elible for the death penalty . The Navajo Nation, along with the vast majority of American tribes, has opted out of federal executions. But John Ashcroft, the attorney general at the time, used a legal loophole to pursue the death penalty anyway. He sought execution because the murders took place  during a carjacking,  which falls under federal authority and does not feature an opt-in or out provision for Native people. The Navajo Nation believes 'traditional peacemaking' should be a legitimate part of the criminal justice system and said "the negative force that drives a person to commit evil acts can only be extracted by the Creator." Mitchell's attorney,  Jon Aminoff , told Newsy the federal government has largely respected the tribal nations' wishes on capital punishment until now. "There have been at least 20 other instances of murder on tribal land in which the DOJ has considered a capital prosecution, but ultimately declined to do so …  This decision violated the spirit, if not the letter, of the Federal Death Penalty Act."On Friday,  Aminoff argued Mitchell's appeal  in front of the Ninth Circuit. He claims there was racial bias in the jury that needs investigation because it did not appropriately represent Mitchell's Native peers, since there was only one Navajo on the jury. As it stands, Mitchell's appeal is the only thing standing between him and execution. Attorney General Barr scheduled five federal executions for the end of 2019 and early 2020. Four of the inmates set to be executed are wrapped up in a lawsuit against Attorney General Barr. Mitchell is not a part of that lawsuit, which means he's not protected by its injunction. According to the  Death Penalty Information Center , 2019 marks the first time in 25 years that a majority of Americans believe life in prison without parole is a better punishment for murder than the death penalty. Číst dále >>> Přeložit do en

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